Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) Training for Sports Medicine Providers in a Pediatric Concussion Program

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Boston Children's Hospital

Status

Completed

Conditions

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

Treatments

Behavioral: Diagnostic and treatment training
Behavioral: Diagnostic training

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT03425786
IRB-P00025099

Details and patient eligibility

About

The investigators are training a group of four pediatric Sports Medicine providers in BPPV maneuvers. All four providers will be trained in the diagnostic maneuvers, and two will be randomly selected to also be trained in the treatment maneuvers. The providers will be encouraged to use the diagnostic maneuvers on all new concussion patients whose initial visit is within 28 days of their injury. They will complete a survey at the start and end of the study to determine if they thought the training affected their understanding of BPPV and confidence in managing it, as well as determine any challenges they faced with learning/administering the maneuvers. Additionally, the investigators will determine if the additional training impacts time to recovery from concussion, as well as determine potential risk factors for BPPV in concussion.

Full description

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common disorder of the inner ear that causes episodes of vertigo. BPPV occurs as a result of displacement of otoliths from their position on the utricle into one of the semicircular canals. Posterior canal BPPV is diagnosed by performing the Dix-Hallpike maneuver, and lateral canal BPPV is diagnosed by performing the supine head roll test (Pagnini-McClure maneuver). Most cases of BPPV will resolve spontaneously, but this can take weeks to months without intervention, and approximately a third of cases will not resolve without treatment. Repositioning maneuvers, such as the Epley maneuver and Barbecue maneuver, move the otolith crystals out of the affected semicircular canal and back to their position on the utricle organ. Such maneuvers have been shown to be highly effective at resolving BPPV, and typically only 1-2 treatments are required. BPPV most commonly occurs as an isolated spontaneous disorder, but it can also occur following a concussion. While the diagnosis and treatment of BPPV is a routine component of most Otolaryngology and Neurology training programs, it is not a component of most Sports Medicine training programs. It is also common that providers who are taught to diagnose BPPV do not know how to treat it. Furthermore, the role of BPPV in concussion recovery has not been well studied. Hoffer and colleagues found BPPV to be present in nearly a third of adult military patients with dizziness immediately following a concussion, and they found that these patients had rapid symptom resolution following repositioning maneuvers. The investigators recently found evidence of BPPV in 21% of patients referred to their pediatric vestibular program clinic for prolonged dizziness symptoms following a concussion. The majority of these patients were successfully treated with repositioning maneuvers following their first visit to the vestibular clinic, but that visit occurred at a mean of 4 months following their initial injury. In order to determine if early recognition and management of BPPV will expedite recovery from concussion in affected patients, the investigators will train a group of four pediatric Sports Medicine providers in BPPV maneuvers. All four providers will be trained by Dr. Jacob Brodsky in the Dix-Hallpike and head roll maneuvers (BPPV diagnosis; Both Groups A & B), and two will be randomly selected to also be trained by Dr. Brodsky in the Epley and Barbecue maneuvers (BPPV treatment; Group A only). The providers will be encouraged to use the Dix-Hallpike and head roll maneuvers on all new concussion patients whose initial visit is within 28 days of their injury to determine if the patients have BPPV. Providers who have been trained in treatment maneuvers (Group A, Early BPPV Management) will be encouraged to perform them accordingly on any patients with positive diagnostic maneuvers. Providers who have not been trained in treatment maneuvers (Group B, Late BPPV Management) will refer patients with suspected BPPV to Dr. Brodsky for treatment, as is currently the routine. Patients are not being directly randomized and do not need to do anything beyond attend their regularly scheduled appointments. The Sports Medicine providers will complete a source document after each visit to document which maneuvers were performed and if the patient has recovered from concussion. They will also complete a survey at the start and end of the study to determine if they thought the training affected their understanding of BPPV and confidence in managing it, as well as determine any challenges they faced with learning/administering the maneuvers. The patients managed by providers in Group A will then be compared to patients managed by providers in Group B by multiple variables, including their post concussion symptom scores (PCSS), time to clearance for return to play, and time to symptom resolution. The investigators will also compare patients who were diagnosed with BPPV to those who were not to evaluate for risk factors for post-concussion BPPV, including comparison of age, gender, migraine history, prior concussion history, and mode of injury.

Enrollment

221 patients

Sex

All

Ages

18 to 99 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

• Sports Medicine providers at Boston Children's Hospital who see a high volume of concussion patients

Exclusion criteria

• None

Trial design

Primary purpose

Other

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

None (Open label)

221 participants in 2 patient groups

Early BPPV Management
Experimental group
Description:
Diagnostic and treatment training for BPPV.
Treatment:
Behavioral: Diagnostic and treatment training
Late BPPV Management
Active Comparator group
Description:
Diagnostic training for BPPV. Sports Medicine providers will refer patients positive for BPPV to an Otolaryngologist at our institution for treatment.
Treatment:
Behavioral: Diagnostic training

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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