Betadine Pleurodesis Via Tunneled Pleural Catheters

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Yale University

Status and phase

Withdrawn
Phase 4

Conditions

Pleural Effusion
Pleural Effusion Due to Congestive Heart Failure
Pleurodesis
Pleural Effusions, Chronic
Pleural Effusion in Conditions Classified Elsewhere
Malignant Pleural Effusion

Treatments

Drug: Povidone-Iodine

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT02975921
2000020017

Details and patient eligibility

About

The purpose of this study is to determine whether betadine (povidone-iodine) instillation during routine indwelling Tunneled Pleural Catheter (TPC) placement is efficacious in promoting pleurodesis and thus reducing the time to TPC removal.

Full description

Tunneled pleural catheter (TPC) placement is a routine clinical procedure used in the setting of recurrent pleural effusions. The most common clinical indication is malignant pleural effusion but these can be used in benign pleural effusions as well (such as those due to congestive heart failure, cirrhosis, etc). The primary benefit of TPC placement is relief of dyspnea without the need for recurrent procedures. Despite success at relieving dyspnea, there are problems with the long-term placement of TPC's. One risk is infection which is estimated at 5%. Furthermore, each drainage kit costs approximately $100 and is often paid out-of-pocket by patients. Over time, this may create a substantial cost burden. Finally, most patients who undergo TPC placement require home drainage by visiting nurses. This is a significant resource utilization and it often requires interruption of a patient's home routines via the visitation requirements. Occasionally, the effusion no longer reaccumulates following TPC placement. In malignant effusions, this pleurodesis (see below) occurs up to 50% of the time in malignant effusions. When pleurodesis occurs, the TPC may be removed by a simple office procedure. Pleurodesis, or the act of inducing scarring and obliteration of the potential space between the visceral and parietal pleura where pleural effusions develop, is a different mechanism of providing relief of dyspnea. In the USA in particular, the most common agent used for pleurodesis (talc) is associated with complications such as respiratory failure and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a life-threatening condition. Talc is also very expensive. Povidone-Iodine, an agent used for pleurodesis in many other countries, has been shown to be highly efficacious when given via other modalities. Studies report a pleurodesis rate of 90+% with Povidone-Iodine. It also has a favorable safety record and is inexpensive. Given all of these factors, the investigators propose a prospective study using Povidone-Iodine at the time of TPC placement to promote pleurodesis. The investigators hypothesize that pleurodesis will occur quickly and frequently, thus enabling removal of the TPC, thereby saving cost, risks of infection, all while improving patients quality of life. The investigators plan on doing this by enrolling patients prospectively who are to undergo TPC placement as part of their standard care. These patients would be prospectively enrolled and randomized to receive either usual care (no pleurodesis) or the investigational medication (povidone-iodine) intrapleurally at time of procedure. The investigators would subdivide groups prospectively between patients who have malignant pleural effusions and those who have benign (non-malignant) pleural effusions. Following TPC placement and medication administration (if necessary), nursing and investigative physicians would then immediately follow them in the recovery area (to monitor for any negative immediate outcomes such as hypertension, hypotension, reactions, or significant pain) and in clinic as per their usual care (starting 1-2 weeks after discharge and as long as necessary). The investigators would monitor them for the outcomes as noted elsewhere.

Sex

All

Ages

18+ years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

Requiring Tunneled Catheter Placement for a Pleural Effusion

Exclusion criteria

  • Patient with a nonexpandable lung
  • Non-english speaker

Trial design

Primary purpose

Treatment

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Single Blind

0 participants in 4 patient groups

Malignant Effusion - Usual Care
No Intervention group
Description:
Patients who had a pleural effusion secondary to a malignant etiology and subsequently underwent tunneled pleural catheter (TPC) placement and had usual care during and afterwards. Usual care is the TPC only with no intrapleural medications. They would have nursing care in the recovery area afterwards and home nursing three times weekly.
Malignant Effusion with Pleurodesis
Experimental group
Description:
Patients who had a pleural effusion secondary to a malignant etiology and subsequently underwent tunneled pleural catheter (TPC) placement and had intrapleural Povidone-Iodine administered at time of placement (100mL of 2% solution). They would have nursing care in the recovery area afterwards and home nursing three times weekly.
Treatment:
Drug: Povidone-Iodine
Benign Effusion - Usual Care
No Intervention group
Description:
Patients who had a pleural effusion secondary to a benign etiology and subsequently underwent tunneled pleural catheter (TPC) placement and had usual care during and afterwards. Usual care is the TPC only with no intrapleural medications. They would have nursing care in the recovery area afterwards and home nursing three times weekly.
Benign Effusion with Pleurodesis
Experimental group
Description:
Patients who had a pleural effusion secondary to a benign etiology and subsequently underwent tunneled pleural catheter (TPC) placement and had intrapleural Povidone-Iodine administered at time of placement (100mL of 2% solution). They would have nursing care in the recovery area afterwards and home nursing three times weekly.
Treatment:
Drug: Povidone-Iodine

Trial contacts and locations

0

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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