Biofeedback Training Fecal Incontinence in Children

B

Batterjee Medical College

Status

Completed

Conditions

Fecal Incontinence in Children

Treatments

Device: Biofeedback
Procedure: Traditional Treatment

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT04472923
BatterjeeMC

Details and patient eligibility

About

Fecal incontinence (FI) is the inability to control bowel movements, causing stool to leak from rectum it ranges from an occasional leakage of stool while passing gas to a complete loss of bowel control after the age of 4 years1. Functional non-retentive fecal incontinence (FNRFI) is fecal incontinence in a child with a mental age of more than 4 years with no evidence of metabolic, inflammatory, or anatomical cause2. The long-term result of biofeedback therapy is one of the most important subjects of controversy, and few studies have extended to 2 years of follow-up 11. So, the purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the short-term and long-term efficacy of biofeedback training as a treatment tool designed to control functional non-retentive fecal incontinence in children and its long term impact on the quality of life.

Full description

Functional non-retentive fecal incontinence (FNRFI) is fecal incontinence in a child with a mental age of more than 4 years with no evidence of metabolic, inflammatory, or anatomical cause2. It is an extremely embarrassing and psychologically frustrating shameful problem with a bad impact on children3. It can lead to social isolation, loss of self-confidence, depression, and behavioral problems4. The underlying mechanism of functional non-retentive fecal incontinence is largely unknown. The pathophysiology seems to be complex and it is considered to be a multifactorial disorder5. Approximately 95% of the children had no organic cause and these children are considered to have a functional defecation disorder. Of this, in approximately 80% of these children FI is results of constipation and is treated with laxatives, the remaining 20% without signs of fecal retention is classified as FNRFI6 The negative psychological and social impact for these children is high, however, and requires adequate intervention7. Biofeedback therapy is a feasible option that has been used for fecal incontinence over several decades8. The underlying premise of biofeedback, as with learning any physical activity, is that "practice makes perfect" if the learner is provided with accurate feedback to make adjustments to optimize performance So, the purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the short-term and long-term efficacy of biofeedback training as a treatment tool designed to control functional non-retentive fecal incontinence in children and its long term impact on the quality of life. Methods: The present study included 100 children of both sexes that were included with an age ranged from (5-14 years) with FNRFI with normal bowel habits, normal defecation frequency, and normal stool consistency with incontinence score ranging from 6-24 according to Vaizey score 12. Exclusion criteria included; children who have traumatic sphincter injury, fecal impaction, spinal diseases causing incontinence, anorectal malformation, and children who were not cooperative. Patients included in this study were randomly divided and allocated into two groups Control group and Study group. Written informed consent was obtained from parents of all included children. A detailed history was taken including bowel habits, duration history of trauma. Complete physical examination to exclude patients requiring surgical correction.

Enrollment

108 patients

Sex

All

Ages

5 to 14 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Age ranged from (5-14 years) with FNRFI with normal bowel habits
  • Children with normal defecation frequency and normal stool consistency
  • Children with incontinence score ranging from 6-24 according to Vaizey score

Exclusion criteria

  • Children who have traumatic sphincter injury.
  • Children who have Fecal impaction
  • Children who have Spinal diseases causing incontinence
  • Children who have Anorectal malformation
  • Children who were not cooperative

Trial design

Primary purpose

Treatment

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Double Blind

108 participants in 2 patient groups

Control group
Active Comparator group
Description:
Patients belonging to the control group received conventional physical therapy program in the form of diet and Kegel exercises.
Treatment:
Procedure: Traditional Treatment
Study group
Experimental group
Description:
Patients belonging to the study group were subjected to the same conventional physical therapy program in addition to biofeedback training
Treatment:
Device: Biofeedback

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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