Bright 1 Bodies Weight Management Program (B1B)

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Yale University

Status

Completed

Conditions

Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1

Treatments

Behavioral: Bright 1 Bodies

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT02768987
1605017843

Details and patient eligibility

About

Physical inactivity occurs among 65% to 95% of youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and based upon limited evidence may contribute to the rapidly growing incidence of overweight among this population. The purpose of the present study is to pilot test a 12-week intensive lifestyle program for adolescents with overweight and T1D utilizing group exercise classes adapted for this population, supplemented with coping skills training and diabetes self-management education to address problem solving behaviors that limit their physical activity and weight control. Our primary aim is to evaluate the changes in physical activity adherence, anthropometrics, and self-management behaviors following this program among sedentary adolescents with T1D and overweight (n=25, OW) compared with sedentary adolescents with T1D and normal weight (n=25, NW). We hypothesize that the OW group will achieve improve physical activity adherence and anthropometrics to the same or greater extent as the NW group and previous Bright Bodies cohorts, and that these changes will correlate with improved exercise-related problem solving. Our secondary aim is to evaluate changes in adipocytokines and epigenetic factors related to the etiology of overweight/obesity following our physical activity intervention. We hypothesize changes in these biomarkers will correlate with changes in anthropometry variables and partially explain any differences in response between the groups and individuals should those occur.

Full description

Prevalence of overweight among patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) of all ages has grown at alarming rates since the 1980s. Physical inactivity occurs among 65% to 95% of youth with T1D and doubles their risk of overweight. A major factor limiting their physical activity appears to be self-managed problem solving around exercise such as adjustments to insulin and diet, which is practiced regularly by less than half of our adolescent patients with T1D and less frequently than any other self-management behavior. Our previous interventions applying coping skills training (ABCs of Diabetes and TeenCope) as well as diabetes self-management (Managing Diabetes) successfully improved problem-solving and other aspects of self-management along with health outcomes among adolescents with T1D, but did not focus on those who were overweight nor promotion of physical activity and weight loss. The Yale Bright Bodies intensive lifestyle program successfully promotes physical activity and weight loss, enrolling >100 overweight youth from greater New Haven annually but does not presently accommodate those with T1D. The purpose of the present study is to pilot test a 12-week intensive lifestyle program for adolescents with overweight and T1D utilizing group exercise classes from Bright Bodies adapted for this population, supplemented with coping skills training and diabetes self-management education to address problem solving behaviors that limit their physical activity and weight control. Our primary aim is to evaluate the changes in physical activity adherence, anthropometrics (body mass index percentile for age, body fat percentage), and self-management behaviors following this 12-week lifestyles program among sedentary adolescents with T1D and overweight (n=25, OW) compared with sedentary adolescents with T1D and normal weight (n=25, NW). We hypothesize that the OW group will achieve improve physical activity adherence and anthropometrics to the same or greater extent as the NW group and previous Bright Bodies cohorts, and that these changes will correlate with improved exercise-related problem solving. Although physical activity is recommended for weight loss, outcomes from increased physical activity have been heterogeneously distributed-not all overweight participants lose weight and some even gain weight. Furthermore the etiologies of overweight/obesity and T1D appear to interact, yet no study has tested the influence of physical activity upon biological pathways related to overweight/obesity for patients with T1D. Accordingly, our secondary aim is to evaluate changes in adipocytokines and epigenetic factors related to the etiology of overweight/obesity following our physical activity intervention. We hypothesize changes in these biomarkers will correlate with changes in anthropometry variables and partially explain any differences in response between the groups and individuals should those occur.

Enrollment

50 estimated patients

Sex

All

Ages

11 to 19 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

Patient of the Yale-New Haven Hospital (YNHH) Pediatrics Long Wharf or Trumbull Diabetes Clinic Diagnosed with T1D 11 to 19 years old Sedentary (exercise less than twice per week over past two months) n=25 overweight (BMI > 85th percentile for age and sex according to Centers for Disease Control Growth Charts) and n=25 normal weight Family willing to commit the time and effort to a family-based lifestyle program.

Exclusion criteria

Endocrinopathies other than type 1 diabetes; adequately treated hypothyroidism, as demonstrated by normal thyroid tests within previous six months, is allowed. Concurrent use of systemic (oral, parenteral) glucocorticoids or other medications known to contribute to obesity; inhaled steroids are allowed. Any use of pharmacological intervention for weight management, including prescription medication, over the counter medication, or herbal supplements. Chronic disease or physical disability that would influence treatment intervention or preclude participation in regular physical activity (e.g., chronic renal failure). Psychological conditions such as uncontrolled eating disorder, psychosis, personality disorders and other disorders that will interfere with the ability to maintain complete follow up and adherence to protocol. Any concurrent membership in a comprehensive weight management program. Inability or unwillingness of the parent to accompany the child to nutrition classes. Pregnancy

Trial design

Primary purpose

Prevention

Allocation

Non-Randomized

Interventional model

Single Group Assignment

Masking

None (Open label)

50 participants in 2 patient groups

Overweight
Experimental group
Description:
Sedentary adolescents with T1D and overweight
Treatment:
Behavioral: Bright 1 Bodies
Normal Weight
Experimental group
Description:
Sedentary adolescents with T1D and normal weight
Treatment:
Behavioral: Bright 1 Bodies

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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