Chest Wall Influence on Respiratory System Mechanics in Morbidly Obese Patients

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Mass General Brigham

Status

Completed

Conditions

Obesity
Intra-Abdominal Hypertension

Treatments

Other: Respiratory mechanics assessment

Study type

Observational

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT02105220
2013P001413

Details and patient eligibility

About

The goal of this study is to describe the influence of the chest wall on the respiratory system mechanics in morbidly obese patients and in patients with high intra-abdominal pressure. The effects of increasing and decreasing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on chest wall and total respiratory system mechanics, lung volumes and gas exchange will be evaluated, both during controlled and assisted mechanical ventilation. Patients will be studied, first, during the acute phase of respiratory failure, when requiring intubation and controlled mechanical ventilation. Then, patients will be evaluated again during weaning from the ventilator to assess the influence of PEEP in assisted ventilation prior to extubation.

Full description

The goal of this study is to describe the influence of the chest wall on the respiratory system mechanics. Investigators want to describe how extreme obesity and Intra-Abdominal Hypertension (IAH) affect normal respiratory system behavior. The effects of increasing and decreasing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on respiratory system mechanics, lung volumes and gas exchange will be evaluated, both during controlled and assisted mechanical ventilation. Investigators will record and compare lung volumes, airway and transpulmonary pressure, gas exchange and hemodynamic changes caused by variations of PEEP. Patients will be studied, first, during the acute phase of respiratory failure, when requiring intubation and controlled mechanical ventilation. Patients will then again be evaluated during weaning from the ventilator to assess the influence of PEEP in assisted ventilation prior to extubation. Investigators believe that assessment of the transpulmonary pressure and lung volumes is essential to correctly evaluate respiratory system function in patients in which the relationship between the lung and chest wall is altered. Improper mechanical ventilation leads to lung damage. High ventilatory volume/pressure are associated with lung overdistension, while low volume/pressure leads to lung collapse and cyclic opening and closing of alveoli. All of these mechanisms have been associated with ventilator induced lung injury and poorer outcomes. Adequate PEEP and transpulmonary pressure are fundamental in preventing this vicious cycle.

Enrollment

14 patients

Sex

All

Ages

18+ years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • 18 years or older
  • Requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation
  • BMI≥40 kg/m2 or IAP≥12 mmHg

Exclusion criteria

  • Known presence esophageal varices
  • Recent esophageal trauma or surgery
  • Severe thrombocytopenia (PTL≤10,000/mm3)
  • Severe coagulopathy (INR≥2)
  • Presence of pneumothorax
  • Pregnancy
  • Patients with diagnosed moderate to severe ARDS or with poor oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2 < 200 mmHg)

Trial design

14 participants in 2 patient groups

Obese
Description:
We will enroll patients with BMI≥40 kg/m2 to describe the impact of obesity on chest wall compliance and respiratory mechanics. Respiratory mechanics assessment: We will assess respiratory mechanics through different end expiratory pressure settings and recording airway and esophageal pressure tracings.
Treatment:
Other: Respiratory mechanics assessment
Intraabdominal Hypertension
Description:
We will enroll patients with IAP≥12 mmHg to describe the impact of intraabdominal hypertension on chest wall compliance and respiratory mechanics. Respiratory mechanics assessment: We will assess respiratory mechanics through different end expiratory pressure settings and recording airway and esophageal pressure tracings.
Treatment:
Other: Respiratory mechanics assessment

Trial contacts and locations

0

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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