Eating Peanuts for Health

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Purdue University

Status

Completed

Conditions

Overweight
Hyperlipidemia
Obesity

Treatments

Other: Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other
Other U.S. Federal agency

Identifiers

NCT01886326
0912008773

Details and patient eligibility

About

Evidence is accumulating that peanut consumption confers health benefits, such as reduction of cardiovascular disease risk and possibly diabetes risk (Jenkins et al., 2008; Mattes et al., 2008). However, peanuts are a high fat, energy dense food and concerns about weight gain are widespread. Although research indicates that other characteristics of peanuts offset these properties, and that peanuts may be incorporated into diets without posing a threat to weight gain (Mattes et al., 2008), concern remains among policymakers, healthcare providers, and consumers. Furthermore, worry exists that eating salted peanuts may elevate blood pressure and that eating honey-roasted peanuts make elevate blood sugar. These fears create substantial obstacles to increased peanut consumption. Recommendations to increase peanut consumption may be made, but if they are not followed, there will be no impact on health. Additional knowledge is needed on: (1) the acceptability of peanuts consumed on a chronic basis, (2) the chronic intake of moderate levels of peanuts and body weight, and 3) the effects of peanuts on blood pressure and blood sugar. The proposed research will examine the acceptability of long-term inclusion of a single form versus varied forms of peanuts in the diet. It is expected that responses will be varied among individuals with different personality characteristics (e.g., prefer sweet versus savory foods, hedonic versus non-hedonic eaters). A better understanding of how different segments of the population choose to include peanuts in their diet and how to optimize long-term consumption should provide insights for better marketing and improved health. Furthermore, it is anticipated that eating salty peanuts will not raise blood pressure and that eating honey-roasted peanuts will not raise blood sugar. Documenting this will add credibility to the evidence that peanuts do not cause weight gain, as well as reinforce recommendations to increase peanut consumption for their health benefits.

Enrollment

196 patients

Sex

All

Ages

18 to 50 years old

Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Between 18 and 50 years of age
  • Weight stable (< 3 kg weight change within last 3 months)
  • Constant habitual activity patterns (no deviation > 1x/wk at 30 min/session within last 3 months)
  • Constant habitual diet patterns within last 3 months
  • Willingness to eat all test foods (peanuts daily for 12 weeks)
  • No allergy to foods provided in the study (peanuts)
  • Not a daily peanut or tree nut consumer
  • Not planning to change use of medications known to influence appetite or metabolism
  • Not diabetic or hypertensive
  • No history of gastrointestinal pathology
  • Non-smoker for one year or more

Exclusion criteria

-

Trial design

Primary purpose

Prevention

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

None (Open label)

196 participants in 6 patient groups

Consumption of 42 g of salted peanuts
Experimental group
Description:
Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Treatment:
Other: Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Consumption of 42 g of unsalted peanuts
Experimental group
Description:
Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Treatment:
Other: Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Consumption of 42 g of spicy peanuts
Experimental group
Description:
Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Treatment:
Other: Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Consumption of 42 g of honey peanuts
Experimental group
Description:
Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Treatment:
Other: Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Consumption of 42 g of 3 diff. varieties
Experimental group
Description:
Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Treatment:
Other: Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Consumption of 42 g of var. of types
Experimental group
Description:
Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily
Treatment:
Other: Consumption of 42 grams of peanuts daily

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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