Effectiveness of Musical Training in Children From Low Income Families

The University of Hong Kong (HKU) logo

The University of Hong Kong (HKU)

Status

Completed

Conditions

Child

Treatments

Behavioral: musical training

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT02762786
PhD_2

Details and patient eligibility

About

This study aims to examine the effectiveness of musical training in promoting happiness and quality of life of preschool children from low-income families. Participants in the experimental group will attend a weekly 1-hour musical training lesson for 12 weeks conducted by the Music Children Foundation. While participants in the waitlist control group received the same training after the experimental group had completed the intervention.

Full description

Children from low income families generally suffer from hard conditions,such as poor living conditions, inadequate nutrition, and delay in accessing health care services. Such problems may made children suffer from developmental problems and malnutrition and to have a lower level of intelligence and difficulties in language comprehension, which may not only have profound impacts on children's physical well-being, but on their psychological well-being as well. Musical training is considered to have potential for promoting psychological well-being among children mostly because music is found to be important to a child's early psychological development. A growing number of educators and researchers suggest that, of all the stages of life, infancy may be the time when music has the most important impact on an individual. Babies hear language long before they are able to comprehend it. The quality and the quantity of what is unconsciously absorbed in infancy relates directly to later development. Musical training has been used for various purposes such as improving language development, self-expression, memory skills, concentration, social interaction, fine motor skills, listening, problem-solving, teamwork, goal setting, and coordination. More importantly, when a child learns to sing and play music, other areas of development - creativity, family bonding, self-esteem, confidence, emotional development - are also positively impacted. Nevertheless, although musical training is popular and is considered to be a beneficial intervention in the promotion of psychological well-being, longitudinal studies that examine the efficacy of music-making in children from low-income families are limited. Importantly, there is to date no study that examines the effects of musical training on enhancing the psychological well-being among these children. There is an imperative need for rigorous empirical scrutiny of the effectiveness of musical training in promoting the psychological well-being of children from low-income families. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of musical training in promoting happiness and quality of life of preschool children from low-income families.

Enrollment

171 patients

Sex

All

Ages

3 to 6 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • be aged from 3 to 6 years,
  • be able to communicate in Cantonese,
  • be from low-income families; that is, less than half the median monthly household income or recipients of Comprehensive Social Security Assistance.

Exclusion criteria

  • children who had studied or were studying (at the time of the intervention) a musical instrument
  • children who were receiving other community services at the time of the intervention,
  • children with chronic illness or identified cognitive and learning problems.

Trial design

Primary purpose

Supportive Care

Allocation

Non-Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Single Blind

171 participants in 2 patient groups

Experimental
Experimental group
Description:
Participants in the experimental group will receive weekly one-hour lessons on musical training for 12 weeks, conducted by the Music Children Foundation. The Music Children Foundation is a non-governmental organization established by a group of professional musicians with the objective of transforming children's lives and instils positive values in the entire community through music. It aims to provide free musical training to low-income children and children with chronic diseases, including those with Down's syndrome, mucopolysaccharidoses, skeletal dysplasia and visual impairment.
Treatment:
Behavioral: musical training
Wait-list control group
No Intervention group
Description:
Participants in the waitlist control group will receive the same training after the experimental group had completed the intervention.

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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