Effectiveness of Proprioceptive Training on Dynamic Postural Balance During Pregnancy

K

Kafrelsheikh University

Status

Completed

Conditions

Balance
Disturbance
Pregnancy

Treatments

Other: Control
Other: Proprioceptive exercises

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT02694107
FF1972

Details and patient eligibility

About

The purpose of the present study was to measure the effect of proprioceptive training, short-term, on dynamic postural balance during pregnancy and after 8 weeks of follow-up. Thirty-nine pregnant women were randomized to either the intervention group(n=20) , which would perform proprioceptive exercise, or the control group(n=19, no intervention) .

Full description

Improvement in the postural balance of pregnant women may be the improvement in joint mechanoreceptor activation present in the joint capsules, medial ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, and meniscus, which result in improved articular stabilization and, consequently, a possible increase in the musculature's ability to provide co-contraction. Improved their postural control after the intervention may have been due to central and peripheral nervous system balance control circuits and strength gains, which showed improvements extending from the second to the third trimester . The maintenance of postural balance requires the integration of the visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems. At the spinal level, first level of motor control, nervous reflex movement patterns are received from higher levels of the nervous system. This provides for reflex splinting during conditions of abnormal stress about the joint and has significant implications for rehabilitation.The muscle spindles play a major role in the control of muscular movement by adjusting activity in the lower motor neurons. The second level of motor control is the brain stem, where the joint afferent is relayed to maintain the posture and balance of the body. Information delivered to the brain stem emanates from the joint proprioceptors, the vestibular centers in the ears, and the eyes.The final aspect of motor control includes the highest level of CNS function (motor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum)and is mediated by cognitive awareness of body position and movement. Movements that are repeated can be stored as central commands, and can be performed without continuous reference to consciousness. This better joint afferent between the peripheral and central nervous system control may be reflected in the improvement of balance during pregnancy, as observed in this study as a result of proprioceptive training delivered to pregnant women.

Enrollment

39 patients

Sex

Female

Ages

25 to 30 years old

Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Maternal age between 25 and 30 years,
  • Gestational age was 20 weeks gestation,
  • Body mass index not exceeding 30 kg/m2,
  • Low risk pregnancy,
  • Single fetus,
  • Healthy sensory motor function in the lower limbs.

Exclusion criteria

  • Gestational diabetes,
  • Pre-eclampsia,
  • Toxemia,
  • Gestational hypertension,
  • Previous abortion,
  • High-risk pregnancy,
  • Type I or Type II diabetes ,
  • Any condition that could affect sensation,
  • A leg or foot fracture or ankle or knee sprain within the last year,
  • Current back or knee pain,
  • Cardiovascular, neurologic, neuromuscular, or pulmonary disease,
  • Vertigo, balance or any visual problems,or psychological illness.
  • Current smokers,
  • Currently taking any medication that would affect their ability to balance.

Trial design

Primary purpose

Prevention

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Double Blind

39 participants in 2 patient groups

Proprioceptive exercises
Experimental group
Description:
Proprioceptive exercises performed 3 sessions per week for 4weeks
Treatment:
Other: Proprioceptive exercises
Other: Control
Control
No Intervention group
Description:
Without any exercises

Trial contacts and locations

0

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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