Effects of Kinesiotaping and Physiotherapy in Grade 2 Osteoarthritis Following Degenerative Meniscal Tears

G

Gopal Nambi

Status

Completed

Conditions

Meniscus Tear
Knee Osteoarthritis

Treatments

Device: Kinesiotaping

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT06227078
RHPT/021/093

Details and patient eligibility

About

Degenerative meniscal tears are a common cause of osteoarthritis commonly diagnosed in football players and are considered a major risk factor for the development of knee osteoarthritis. This study aimed to investigate the Clinical and functional effects of kinesiotaping and physiotherapy in grade 2 osteoarthritis following degenerative meniscal tears in football players.

Full description

Degenerative meniscal tears represent a prevalent issue among football players and are frequently associated with an increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. This study seeks to explore the clinical and functional impacts of employing kinesiotaping and physiotherapy as interventions in grade 2 osteoarthritis resulting from degenerative meniscal tears in football players. Kinesiotaping is a therapeutic technique involving the application of specialized elastic tapes to targeted areas, aiming to support injured muscles and joints, enhance circulation, and alleviate pain. Physiotherapy, on the other hand, employs a range of exercises and modalities to promote healing and improve joint function. Both modalities are commonly used in sports medicine to manage musculoskeletal injuries. The investigation focuses on football players diagnosed with grade 2 osteoarthritis secondary to degenerative meniscal tears. Grade 2 osteoarthritis signifies moderate cartilage loss and potential joint instability. The participants will be divided into two groups: one receiving kinesiotaping in combination with physiotherapy and the other undergoing conventional physiotherapy alone. Clinical assessments will include pain levels, joint swelling, and range of motion. Functional outcomes such as strength, agility, and proprioception will be measured through standardized tests. The study's duration and follow-up periods will allow for a comprehensive evaluation of both short-term and long-term effects. The hypothesis underlying this research posits that the combined approach of kinesiotaping and physiotherapy will yield superior outcomes compared to traditional physiotherapy alone. Potential benefits may include reduced pain, improved joint stability, enhanced functional capacity, and a decreased risk of further degeneration. By shedding light on the efficacy of these interventions, this study aspires to contribute valuable insights to the field of sports medicine, aiding in the development of evidence-based strategies for managing degenerative meniscal tears and mitigating the risk of osteoarthritis in football players. The findings could inform clinical practice and potentially influence rehabilitation protocols for athletes facing similar challenges.

Enrollment

56 patients

Sex

All

Ages

18 to 35 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

Diagnosis of Knee Osteoarthritis:

Individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis based on clinical and/or radiological assessments.

Mild to Moderate Knee OA:

Kinesiotaping may be more appropriate for individuals with mild to moderate knee OA rather than severe cases.

Presence of Pain and Discomfort:

Individuals experiencing pain, discomfort, or limitations in function related to knee osteoarthritis.

Functional Limitations:

Those with functional limitations in activities of daily living or reduced mobility due to knee OA.

No Contraindications:

Individuals without contraindications to kinesiotaping, such as skin allergies, infections, or open wounds in the application area.

Willingness to Participate:

Individuals who are willing to participate in and adhere to the kinesiotaping intervention.

Not Responsive to Other Conservative Treatments:

Those who have tried and not responded adequately to other conservative treatments for knee OA, such as exercise, physical therapy, or oral medications.

Absence of Serious Comorbidities:

Individuals without serious comorbidities or medical conditions that may contraindicate the use of kinesiotaping.

Individual Preferences:

Consideration of individual preferences and acceptance of kinesiotaping as part of the treatment plan.

Exclusion criteria

    1. Skin Conditions:

    • Active skin infections, allergies, or open wounds in the area where kinesiotape is to be applied.

    • Skin conditions that may be aggravated or worsened by the adhesive in the tape. 2. Vascular Disorders:

    • Conditions that affect blood circulation, such as peripheral vascular disease, deep vein thrombosis, or other vascular disorders, which may be worsened by the application of kinesiotape.

      1. Peripheral Neuropathy:
    • Individuals with peripheral neuropathy or other nerve disorders, as kinesiotaping may affect sensation, and there is a risk of injury or discomfort.

      1. Cancer or Tumors:
    • Active cancer or tumors in the region where kinesiotape is to be applied, as kinesiotaping could interfere with cancer treatment or exacerbate symptoms.

      1. Joint Instability:
    • Individuals with severe joint instability, as kinesiotape may not provide sufficient support for highly unstable joints.

      1. Allergies to Tape Components:
    • Known allergies to the materials or adhesive used in kinesiotape. 7. Circulatory Disorders:

    • Severe circulatory disorders, which may be exacerbated by the pressure or tension applied by kinesiotape.

Trial design

Primary purpose

Treatment

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Single Blind

56 participants in 2 patient groups, including a placebo group

Active Kinesiotaping + Physiotherapy
Active Comparator group
Description:
The application of kinesiotaping for grade 2 osteoarthritis involves the application of an anchor strip at one end of the affected joint, typically with no stretch. Apply the kinesiotape with the desired amount of stretch, usually around 50-80% of its maximum stretch capacity. Direct the tape along the muscle or joint in a specific pattern, such as "I," "Y," or "X" depending on the therapeutic goal. Finish with an anchor strip at the opposite end, with no stretch to secure the tape in place. Physiotherapy: Apply TENS: Low-frequency TENS (2-10 Hz) that produces a tingling or buzzing sensation without causing discomfort or pain. TENS sessions may last between 20 to 30 minutes per session. Strengthening exercises: Quadriceps Sets: Straight Leg Raises: Seated Leg Press: Hamstring Curls: Calf Raises: Repeat the exercises for 10 times, 3 sets in a session for 8 weeks.
Treatment:
Device: Kinesiotaping
Placebo Kinesiotaping + Physiotherapy
Placebo Comparator group
Description:
The application of kinesiotaping for grade 2 osteoarthritis involves the application of an anchor strip at one end of the affected joint, typically with no stretch. Apply the kinesiotape without stretch, Direct the tape along the muscle or joint in a specific pattern, such as "I," "Y," or "X" depending on the therapeutic goal. Finish with an anchor strip at the opposite end, with no stretch to secure the tape in place. Physiotherapy: Apply TENS: Low-frequency TENS (2-10 Hz) that produces a tingling or buzzing sensation without causing discomfort or pain. TENS sessions may last between 20 to 30 minutes per session. Strengthening exercises: Quadriceps Sets: Straight Leg Raises: Seated Leg Press: Hamstring Curls: Calf Raises: Repeat the exercises for 10 times, 3 sets in a session for 8 weeks.
Treatment:
Device: Kinesiotaping

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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