Effects of Pilates Standing Exercises on Walking Mobility and Postural Balance

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Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul

Status

Completed

Conditions

Aging
Postural Balance
Mobility Limitation

Treatments

Other: Standing Pilates protocol
Other: Standard Pilates protocol

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT03526757
8185

Details and patient eligibility

About

Importance: Aging is characterized by numerous molecular, physiological, functional, motor and psychological changes, such as loss of postural balance and reduced muscle mass/strength. Such modifications often lead to reduced physical-functional capacity in the elderly and increased risk of falls. Currently, physical exercise is widely used to improve physical performance and reduce, at least in part, postural instabilities and the risk of falls. In this context, the Pilates method may be a good strategy to improve body balance, muscle strength and, potentially, the perception of quality of life in this population, depending how the exercises are performed. This study seeks to assess whether practicing Pilates exercises in orthostatic position results in differential effects on walking mobility and postural balance in healthy elderly women when compared to the standard sequence in the Pilates method, which involves less time performing exercise in the orthostatic position. The study hypothesis is that a higher relative volume of Pilates exercises performed in the orthostatic position can promote greater benefits in terms of walking mobility and postural balance compared to the standard Pilates protocol in the elderly.

Full description

Importance: Aging is characterized by numerous molecular, physiological, functional, motor and psychological changes, such as loss of postural balance and reduced muscle mass/strength. Such modifications often lead to reduced physical-functional capacity in the elderly and increased risk of falls. Currently, physical exercise is widely used to improve physical performance and reduce, at least in part, postural instabilities and the risk of falls. In this context, the Pilates method may be a good strategy to improve body balance, muscle strength and, potentially, the perception of quality of life in this population, depending how the exercises are performed. Objective: To evaluate whether practicing Pilates exercises in orthostatic position results in differential effects on walking mobility and postural balance in healthy elderly women when compared to the standard sequence in the Pilates method, which involves less time performing exercise in the orthostatic position. Design, Methods and Participants: Clinical, single blind controlled and randomized trial. 36 previously sedentary elderly women will be included in the study and sign a Free and Informed Consent Term (TCLE). The Pilates protocols will be administered over 12 weeks on a bi-weekly scheme, and each session will last approximately 50 minutes. The subjects who agree to participate will be evaluated at baseline and immediately post-intervention. Intervention: Subjects will be randomized to participate in the experimental group (Pilates exercises with emphasis on orthostatic posture) or control group (Pilates exercises practiced following traditional sequence of postures). Main Outcomes and Measurements: The main outcome of the study will be walking mobility and postural balance, assessed using the Timed Up and Go test (single "motor" and dual task "cognitive-motor" tests), BERG Balance Scale, Functional Reach Test, and ABC Balance Confidence Scale). Expected results: The experimental group is expected to perform better in terms of walking mobility and body balance, since hypothetically, a higher relative volume of orthostatic exercises would be more adequate for training anticipatory postural adjustments when compared to the traditional Pilates postural sequence.

Enrollment

36 patients

Sex

Female

Ages

60+ years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Sedentary for at least 6 months
  • To be available for one hour, twice a week, on two different working days to perform the proposed exercises.
  • To show preserved cognitive function, according to the mini-mental state examination criteria;
  • Be able to come and go on their own to the training location (Physiotherapy Laboratory at PUCRS).

Exclusion criteria

  • Clinical contraindications for performing physical exercises;
  • To show severe heart, orthopedic, neurological or other diseases/conditions that may affect the outcome measures;
  • Practicing physical exercises outside the study protocol;
  • Absence of independent gait.

Trial design

Primary purpose

Screening

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Single Blind

36 participants in 2 patient groups

Standing Pilates protocol
Experimental group
Description:
Subjects will be submitted to a bi-weekly, 50-minute session of Pilates exercises focusing on orthostatic position, for twelve weeks. The following equipment will be used: The Cadillac, Reformer and Chair, emphasizing balance training in the orthostatic position.
Treatment:
Other: Standing Pilates protocol
Standard Pilates protocol
Active Comparator group
Description:
Subjects will be submitted to a bi-weekly, 50-minute session of the standard sequence of Pilates exercises (traditional sequence of the contemporary / classical method) for twelve weeks. The exercises will be performed using the same equipment used in the intervention group, but following the dorsal decubitus, sedestation and orthostasis, in a time-balanced distribution in each session.
Treatment:
Other: Standard Pilates protocol

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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