Effects of Strength Training on Knee Osteoarthritis

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Indiana University

Status and phase

Completed
Phase 2

Conditions

Osteoarthritis, Knee

Treatments

Procedure: Progressive resistance exercise

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other
NIH

Identifiers

NCT00000406
NIAMS-022
P60 AR20582 Substudy EEHSR3
P60AR020582 (U.S. NIH Grant/Contract)

Details and patient eligibility

About

To understand the effects of leg strengthening exercise, we will study the effects of strength training of the legs in four groups of people: (1) osteoarthritis (OA) with knee pain; (2) OA without knee pain; (3) no OA but elderly with knee pain; and (4) normal elderly with no OA or knee pain. In each of the first three groups, we will look at whether people who do strength training have less pain and/or slower progression of x-ray signs of OA over 30 months than people who perform nonstrengthening, range-of-motion exercises. We are including the fourth group to find out whether people with OA (groups 1 \& 2) have the same response to strength training as healthy elderly people, and whether those with knee pain (groups 1 \& 3) have the same response to training as those without joint pain.

Full description

Several studies have confirmed that weak leg muscles are associated with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Studies of body composition in these people have also shown that, despite being weaker, people with OA have significantly greater muscle mass than those without OA, suggesting that those with OA may have the potential to greatly increase their strength. However, research has not clearly shown whether exercises designed to improve leg strength will decrease the severity of pain or slow the progression of OA based on radiographic (x-ray) analysis. To understand the effects of leg strengthening exercise, we will perform a randomized clinical trial of lower extremity strength training using four subgroups of people: (1) OA with knee pain; (2) OA without knee pain; (3) no OA with knee pain; and (4) normal elderly with no OA or knee pain. In each of the first three groups, we will determine whether people assigned to strength training have lower pain scores and/or slower progression of radiographic changes of OA over 30 months than controls who perform nonstrengthening exercises (i.e., range-of-motion exercises). We are including the fourth group to determine whether those with OA (groups 1 & 2) exhibit the same response to strength training as healthy elderly people, and whether those with knee pain (groups 1 & 3) have the same response to training as those without joint pain. We will also prospectively monitor changes in body composition and bone mass, quality of life, and symptoms of depression.

Sex

All

Ages

60+ years old

Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Males and females 60 to 100 years of age

Exclusion criteria

  • Knee joint replacement surgery
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Uncontrollable hypertension
  • Neuropathies of the lower extremity
  • Poor mental cognition (i.e., inability to follow instructions)

Trial design

Primary purpose

Treatment

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Single Group Assignment

Masking

Single Blind

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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