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Effects of Task-oriented Training in Patients With Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction

G

Gazi University

Status

Completed

Conditions

Peripheral Vestibular Disorders

Treatments

Other: Task-oriented training
Other: Control group

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT06019104
25901600-604.01.01-12

Details and patient eligibility

About

The peripheral vestibular disorder is a heterogeneous disorder that occurs due to unilateral or bilateral involvement of the peripheral vestibular organs in the inner ear, characterized by dizziness, balance disorder, visual blurring with head movements, postural instability, and gait disturbance. In the treatment of vestibular disorders, medical and surgical approaches, as well as vestibular rehabilitation are included. Vestibular rehabilitation should aim at repetitive stimulation of the vestibular sensory organs and improving peripheral sensory inputs by providing strong synaptic plasticity between the hair cells in these organs and the damaged parts of the vestibular system. According to this information, task-oriented training based on the practice of the task in the real environment with plenty of repetition seems to be a suitable method for the requirements of the treatment of vestibular disorders. This study was planned to examine the effects of task-oriented training on balance and gait in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders.

Full description

Patients with peripheral vestibular disorders refrain from moving because of the increase in dizziness and fear of falling. These patients prefer to stay still and limit themselves even in simple daily life activities such as vacuuming, cleaning the table, and walking. From this point of view, it is thought that using the tasks in daily life or the activities that form the basis of these tasks in treatment as in task-oriented training will reduce the activity limitations caused by vestibular disorders.

In the recovery of the vestibular system, it is important to practice the functions that increase the symptoms with many repetitions. For example, symptoms that occur without head movement in the acute period after vestibular injury resolve rapidly, and disappear to a large extent as vestibular compensation develops. However, as the disease becomes chronic, losses occur in afferent inputs from the vestibular system and cause a negative effect on dynamic reflex functions. Therefore, vestibular rehabilitation should be aimed to stimulate the vestibular sensory organs repeatedly and to improve peripheral sensory inputs by providing strong synaptic plasticity between the hair cells in these organs and the damaged parts of the vestibular system. According to this information, task-oriented training based on the practice of the task in the real environment with plenty of repetition seems to be a suitable method for the requirements of the treatment of vestibular disorders.

In addition, there is evidence that task-oriented training improves balance, mobility, and gait reduces the risk of falls, and improves the quality of life in neurological diseases such as Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. This information supports the investigators' idea that task-oriented training may also be beneficial in improving balance and walking performance, which are the main symptoms of peripheral vestibular disorder.

On the other hand, when the investigators examine the literature, there is no study examining the effects of task-oriented education in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders.

The primary aim of this study is to examine the effects of task-oriented training on vertigo, dizziness, balance, gait and falls in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. The secondary aim of the investigators' study is to examine the effects of task-oriented training on disability level and quality of life in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders.

Enrollment

28 patients

Sex

All

Ages

18 to 65 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Receiving a diagnosis of peripheral vestibular disorder by a specialist physician
  • Being between the ages of 18-65
  • Not having an inability to prevent the exercise
  • Not having an Orthopedic, Neurological, Rheumatological, etc., which may cause balance disorder.

Exclusion criteria

  • Having cognitive dysfunction that may affect the research results.
  • Having a history of cerebrovascular accident, fainting, or epilepsy
  • Being included in the vestibular rehabilitation program in the last 1 month
  • Being in the acute phase of vestibular disease
  • Having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo
  • Using vestibular suppressant and centrally acting drugs in the last 3 months

Trial design

Primary purpose

Treatment

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Single Blind

28 participants in 2 patient groups

Task-oriented training group
Experimental group
Description:
Among the patients in the task-oriented training group, 12 sessions were given routinely, 3 days a week, for 4 weeks. Task-oriented training consisted of 25 different stations in total, including 9 different gaze stabilization training, 7 balance training, and 9 gait training stations. Gaze stabilization exercises included head-fixed right-left eye movements, head-fixed up-down eye movements, eye fixed right-left head movements, eye fixed up-down head movements, head and eye opposing movements (right-left/ up-down), saccadic and pursuit eye movements (right-left/ up-down). Balance and gait training included these exercises: rolling on the mat, vertical rotation, spinning on a rotary disc, standing on balance bord, jumping, playing dart, reaching, walking forward, walking with head movements (right-left/ up-down), tandem walking, '8' shape walking, walking by picking something up from the ground, walking over an obstacle, walking on treadmill, climbing and descending stairs.
Treatment:
Other: Task-oriented training
Control group
Active Comparator group
Description:
Among the patients in the control group with peripheral vestibular disorders, 12 sessions were given routinely, 3 days a week, for 4 weeks. They were asked to perform gaze stabilization exercises for 1 min. Gaze stabilization exercises consist of head-fixed right-left eye movements, head-fixed up-down eye movements, eye fixed right-left head movements, and eye fixed up-down head movements.
Treatment:
Other: Control group

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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