Endoscopic Management of Esophageal Wall Defects

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Indiana University

Status

Enrolling

Conditions

Esophageal Perforation
Esophageal Fistula

Treatments

Device: Stenting

Study type

Observational

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT04571541
1509223988

Details and patient eligibility

About

The study aim at comparing outcomes from the implementation of various endoscopic closure techniques including stenting and suturing on the healing and resolution of esophageal wall defects.

Full description

Esophageal wall defects are a rare but potentially life-threatening subset of luminal pathology which usually require timely intervention in order to reduce the known associated high morbidity and mortality. These defects can be due to surgical and endoscopic procedures, such as post-operative leaks and fistulas and perforations complicating endoscopic dilation. In addition, defects can occur spontaneously due to Boerhaave's syndrome or following chemoradiation treatments of esophageal or other chest malignancies. Surgical management was historically the mainstay of therapy for these defects with conservative management remaining an alternative in poor surgical candidates. Over the last several years however, interventional endoscopy has played an increasing role in treatment of esophageal wall defects, with endoscopic stenting quickly becoming a viable alternative. Temporary stents including the fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FC-SEMS), partially covered self-expandable metal stents (P-SEMS) and self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS) have all been successfully used and have become increasingly regarded as the new standard of care. Indiana University is a tertiary referral center is a destination for complex thoracic surgery, oncology and esophageal disease referrals. The innovative luminal endoscopy team started employing a several modalities including flexible endoscopic suturing and stenting to close esophageal defects. To our knowledge, there is a dearth of data on outcomes associated with multi-modality esophageal defect closure techniques and little to no data comparing this approach to the current standard of care of stenting alone or surgery.

Enrollment

150 estimated patients

Sex

All

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

Any patient with spontaneous or iatrogenic esophageal wall defect

Exclusion criteria

None

Trial contacts and locations

0

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Central trial contact

Martha Mendez

Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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