ESPB vs TPVB for Cardiac Surgery

M

Medipol University

Status

Withdrawn

Conditions

Cardiovascular Diseases

Treatments

Other: Postoperative management

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT05476393
Medipol Hospital 28

Details and patient eligibility

About

Pain is a common and serious problem after cardiovascular surgery. It is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and additional risk factors of cardiac surgery such as sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass contribute to this. Patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous opioids is standard in many centers for the management of pain after cardiac surgery. However, intravenous opioids have a higher risk of nausea and vomiting and may delay weaning from mechanical ventilation compared to regional techniques. Elderly patients have a higher risk of opioid-related complications, and regional techniques can help reduce postoperative ventilation time and accelerate postoperative recovery, which will reduce the risk of atelectasis, especially in the elderly population. Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) is difficult to apply due to its anatomical proximity to important structures such as the pleura and central neuraxial system, and may cause complications such as pneumothorax and vascular injury. Analgesia management is very important in these patients, since insufficient analgesia may cause pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, pneumonia, and increased oxygen consumption in the postoperative period. Erector spina plane (ESP) block performed with ultrasound (US) is a new interfacial plane block defined by Forero et al. in 2016. If the ESP block is applied at the T5 level, it provides thoracic analgesia, if it is applied at the T7-9 level, it provides analgesia in the abdominal region. In this study, it is aimed to compare the effectiveness of US-guided ESP block and TPVB for postoperative analgesia management after cardiovascular surgery. Our primary aim is to compare postoperative pain scores (NRS), and our secondary aim is to evaluate rescue analgesia using, opioid-related side effects (allergic reaction, nausea, vomiting) and complications that may occur due to block (pneumothorax, hematoma).

Full description

Pain is a common and serious problem after cardiovascular surgery. It is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and additional risk factors of cardiac surgery such as sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass contribute to this. Patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous opioids is standard in many centers for the management of pain after cardiac surgery. However, intravenous opioids have a higher risk of nausea and vomiting and may delay weaning from mechanical ventilation compared to regional techniques. Elderly patients have a higher risk of opioid-related complications, and regional techniques can help reduce postoperative ventilation time and accelerate postoperative recovery, which will reduce the risk of atelectasis, especially in the elderly population. Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) is difficult to apply due to its anatomical proximity to important structures such as the pleura and central neuraxial system, and may cause complications such as pneumothorax and vascular injury. Analgesia management is very important in these patients, since insufficient analgesia may cause pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, pneumonia, and increased oxygen consumption in the postoperative period. Erector spina plane (ESP) block performed with ultrasound (US) is a new interfacial plane block defined by Forero et al. in 2016. If the ESP block is applied at the T5 level, it provides thoracic analgesia, if it is applied at the T7-9 level, it provides analgesia in the abdominal region. This block is applied by injecting a solution containing local anesthetic into the fascia under the erector spina muscle. Since the application site of the ESP block is far from the pleura and neuraxial tissues, it minimizes the risk of complications due to injury to these structures. Sonoanatomy is easy to visualize on US and the spread of local anesthetic can be seen easily. With the cephalo-caudal spread of the local anesthetic solution, analgesia occurs in several dermatomes. Cadaveric studies have shown that the injection spreads to the ventral and dorsal roots of the spinal nerves and creates sensory blockade in both the anterolateral thorax and the posterior. In the literature, it has been reported that it provides effective analgesia in randomized controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of ESP block for postoperative analgesia management after open heart surgery, breast surgery and ventral hernia repair. In this study, it is aimed to compare the effectiveness of US-guided ESP block and TPVB for postoperative analgesia management after cardiovascular surgery. Our primary aim is to compare postoperative pain scores (NRS), and our secondary aim is to evaluate rescue analgesia using, opioid-related side effects (allergic reaction, nausea, vomiting) and complications that may occur due to block (pneumothorax, hematoma).

Sex

All

Ages

18 to 70 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification I-III
  • Scheduled for cardiovascular surgery under general anesthesia

Exclusion criteria

  • Bleeding diathesis
  • anticoagulant treatment
  • local anesthetics and opioid allergy
  • Infection of the skin at the site of the needle puncture
  • Patients who do not accept the procedure

Trial design

0 participants in 2 patient groups

Erector spinae block (Group ESPB)
Active Comparator group
Description:
ESP block will be applied in Group ESPB. The US probe will be placed longitudinally 2-3 cm lateral to the T5 transverse process. Three muscles from top to bottom; Trapezius at the top, rhomboid major in the middle, and the erector spina muscle at the bottom will be displayed over the hyperechoic transverse process. Using the in plane technique, the block needle will be advanced in the cranio-caudal direction and 5 ml of saline will be injected under the erector spina muscle and the block location will be confirmed. After the block location is confirmed, 40 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine will be administered (20 ml in each side).
Treatment:
Other: Postoperative management
Thoracal paravertebral block group (Group TPVB)
Active Comparator group
Description:
After visualizing the T5 spinous process sagittally with the US probe, the probe will be placed 2-3 cm laterally. The ribs and transverse processes will be displayed as hyperechoic structures. Superiorly, the costotransverse ligament and anteriorly the pleura will be visualized. With the in-plane technique, the block needle will be advanced in the cranio-caudal direction until the costotransverse ligament is passed. 5 ml of saline will be injected and the block location will be confirmed. After confirming the location of the needle, negative aspiration is performed, and after observing the absence of CSF, blood and air, 40 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine will be administered, and it will be seen that the pleura is pushed down as the drug is administered (20 ml in each side).
Treatment:
Other: Postoperative management

Trial contacts and locations

0

Loading...

Central trial contact

Nurdan Yılmaz, Assist prof, MD; Bahadir Ciftci, Assoc prof, MD

Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

Clinical trials

Find clinical trialsTrials by location

Resources

© Copyright 2024 Veeva Systems