Evaluation of Educational Interventions Targeting Beliefs About Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

E

Eskisehir Osmangazi University

Status

Invitation-only

Conditions

Education, Medical
HPV
Intervention
Beliefs

Treatments

Behavioral: Misbeliefs about HPV training

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT06198491
E-80558721-050.99-413737

Details and patient eligibility

About

The goal of this clinical trial is to compare the effects of two different educational training programs on beliefs about Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in a group of female hospital employees. The main questions it aims to answer are: • Within the scope of the study, are the training programs provided to reduce misconceptions about HPV effective? • Which educational program is more effective in reducing misconceptions about HPV? Participants will • Complete a pre-test online the day before the first training date to determine the level of their misconceptions about HPV. • Receive informative messages via Whatsapp once a day for three days according to the training program they are assigned to. • Repeat the pre-test at the end of the training programs and one month later. • Receive the more effective training program after one month after the test repetition for the control group. Researchers will compare "Misbeliefs about HPV" and "Current Knowledge about HPV" titled training programs on reducing misconceptions about HPV.

Full description

The human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause health problems ranging from warts in the mouth or genital area to cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile and anal cancers. Some beliefs about diseases or infectious agents have a negative impact on the early diagnosis and treatment of diseases, particularly by increasing the stigmatization effect of sexually transmitted diseases. Features such as the fact that mucosal contact is sufficient for transmission, that infected people can be symptom-free for a long time, that cancer often develops slowly, and that there are similarities with other sexually transmitted viruses such as HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) or herpes can have a negative impact on knowledge and beliefs about HPV. It is known that it is crucial to emphasize correct information, not to repeat or point out inaccuracies when taking action to combat false beliefs or myths. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, the importance of this approach has been frequently emphasized in the guidance contained in the confirmatory information on misinformation and disinformation. In our study, we want to compare the effectiveness of education models in which false beliefs or myths about HPV are conveyed before or after the current information.

Enrollment

102 estimated patients

Sex

Female

Ages

18+ years old

Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Woman
  • Age >18 years and older
  • Those who agree to participate in the study

Exclusion criteria

  • Age <18 years
  • Those who not agree to participate in the study

Trial design

Primary purpose

Prevention

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Double Blind

102 participants in 2 patient groups

Training for HPV misbeliefs 1
Experimental group
Description:
Participants will receive misbeliefs about HPV; training where misbeliefs are mentioned before the current information.
Treatment:
Behavioral: Misbeliefs about HPV training
Training for HPV misbeliefs 2
Experimental group
Description:
Participants will receive misbeliefs about HPV; training where misbeliefs are mentioned after the current information.
Treatment:
Behavioral: Misbeliefs about HPV training

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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