Evaluation of Gel and Solution of Chlorhexidine in Disinfection Root Canals of Primary Anterior Teeth.

D

Damascus University

Status

Completed

Conditions

Dental Caries
Tooth, Deciduous
Infection, Bacterial

Treatments

Other: Sodium hypochlorite solution
Other: Activated chlorhexidine solution
Other: Chlorhexidine solution
Other: Activated chlorhexidine gel
Other: Chlorhexidine gel

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT05361278
UDDS-Pedo-02-2022

Details and patient eligibility

About

The process of removing bacteria and their products from the root canals is an essential step that is achieved through the combination of mechanical preparation and irrigation with chemicals. However, mechanical preparation alone can not reduce the microbial formations inside root canals, so at least about 35% of the root canal walls remain without the preparation tools reaching them. Many irrigants were used to irrigate the root canals, as sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine are the most famous. Although most studies have proven the effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite with its different concentrations in accomplishing this task, some of them showed the inability of the irrigant fluid to eliminate Enterococcus faecalis inside the canals. These bacteria are highly resistant, and therefore endodontic treatment fails in the long term.

Full description

Bacteria and their products play an essential role in the initiation and persistence of endodontic diseases. Therefore, eliminating them and preventing the return of their effectiveness is the desired goal in any successful endodontic treatment in the short and long term. Due to the fact that mechanical preparation of the root canal alone is not capable of removing the entire bacterial content, chemical irrigants were considered necessary to reduce the number of bacteria and toxins resulting from them. Until now, there is no irrigant capable of removing the entire bacterial content from the root canal. Despite the many advantages of sodium hypochlorite, several studies have revealed the toxicity of the solution in high concentrations of it, and it tends to cause tissue irritation when it comes into contact with the apical tissues. Chlorhexidine has been used for a long time in dentistry due to its antibacterial properties, long period of effect, and relatively low toxicity. This has prompted its use as an irrigant and an intra-canal dressing in endodontic treatment.

Enrollment

15 patients

Sex

All

Ages

4 to 9 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Definitely positive or positive ratings of Frank scale.
  • Physiological root resorption no more than the apical third
  • Symptoms or signs of pulpal necrosis with or without radial lesions (swelling - fistua - abnormal movement).
  • At least 2 mm of bone surrounding the permanent bud.
  • Children who have not taken antibiotics in the past 3 months.

Exclusion criteria

  • Systematic or mental disorders.
  • Definitely negative or negative ratings of Frankel scale
  • Existence external or internal abnormal absorption.

Trial design

Primary purpose

Treatment

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Single Group Assignment

Masking

Triple Blind

15 participants in 5 patient groups

Chlorhexidine irrigation solution
Experimental group
Description:
CHx 2% solution will be used.
Treatment:
Other: Chlorhexidine solution
Activated chlorhexidine irrigation solution
Experimental group
Description:
CHx 2% solution will be used with ultrasonic activation.
Treatment:
Other: Activated chlorhexidine solution
Chlorhexidine irrigation gel
Experimental group
Description:
CHx 2% gel will be used.
Treatment:
Other: Chlorhexidine gel
Activated chlorhexidine irrigation gel
Experimental group
Description:
CHx 2% gel will be used with ultrasonic activation.
Treatment:
Other: Activated chlorhexidine gel
Sodium hypochlorite irrigation solution
Other group
Description:
NaOCl 5,25% solution will be used.
Treatment:
Other: Sodium hypochlorite solution

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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