Exercise as an Modulator of Immunological Risk Factors for Osteoporosis

E

East Tennessee State University

Status

Completed

Conditions

Osteoporosis

Treatments

Other: Supervised exercise program

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT02765945
96-028f

Details and patient eligibility

About

This is the second phase of a study designed to determine the immunological effects of long-term exercise on risk factors for ischemic heart disease (phase 1) and osteoporosis (phase 2). The results indicate that six months of moderate intensity exercise reduces bone resorption and increases the secretion of anti-osteoclastogenic cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

Full description

In a before and after trial involving 43 healthy adults the investigators measured the effect of six months of supervised exercise on the spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-induced production of osteoclastogenic cytokines (interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α), anti-osteoclastogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor-β, interleukins 4 and10), pleiotropic cytokines with variable effects on osteoclastogenesis (interferon-γ, interleukin-6), and T cell growth and differentiation factors (interleukins 2 and 12) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The investigators also measured lymphocyte phenotypes, and serum markers of bone formation (osteocalcin), bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of Type I collagen), and bone homeostasis (estradiol, vitamin D2, testosterone, parathyroid hormone, insulin-like growth factor).

Enrollment

43 patients

Sex

All

Ages

30 to 60 years old

Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

Normal exercise treadmill test

Exclusion criteria

Any medical condition that would prevent participation in a six month exercise program

Trial design

Primary purpose

Basic Science

Allocation

N/A

Interventional model

Single Group Assignment

Masking

None (Open label)

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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