Gaze Training on Task Performance Regional Anaesthesia

U

University of Nottingham

Status and phase

Unknown
Phase 3

Conditions

Anesthesia

Treatments

Other: Gaze training
Other: Discovery learning

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT04426227
434-1912

Details and patient eligibility

About

Regional anaesthesia is the performance of spinal, epidural or peripheral nerve blocks to allow patients to undergo surgery awake and to provide post-operative pain relief. Anaesthetists inject local anaesthetic using specialist needles close to nerves to prevent transmission of pain. Hand-held ultrasound is often used by anaesthetists to direct these needles to the correct position i.e. close to, but not in the nerve itself. If the needle is not adequately seen using the hand-held ultrasound it may pierce the nerve causing permanent nerve damage and significant patient harm. Within the time and resource constraints of postgraduate medical training, it would be advantageous to optimise expertise acquisition of practical skills with a cheap, self-directed educational intervention. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine whether gaze training is associated with improved performance of an ultrasound-guided needle task. The investigators hypothesise that improved gaze control will translate to better technical performance of an ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia task.

Enrollment

43 estimated patients

Sex

All

Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering or Maths (STEM) students who are capable of giving informed consent

Exclusion criteria

  • Previous experience of gaze training or eye tracking software
  • Previous experience of regional anaesthesia needling tasks

Trial design

Primary purpose

Other

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Double Blind

43 participants in 2 patient groups

Group Gaze
Experimental group
Description:
The gaze-trained group will be shown a video, derived from the eye tracker, of an expert's visual control whilst performing the ultrasound task. Participants will be made aware of the target-focused gaze strategy (lengthy and stable fixations on the needling target), and the manner in which the gaze shifted from target to tools (hands, needle and transducer) in a fast, smooth fashion. They will then be advised to try to mimic the gaze strategy of the expert while undertaking the needling task as their first training task. After completion of this training task, participants will be shown their own video data, as captured by the eye tracker. Participants will be asked to comment on differences between their own video and the expert video they had previously seen. This feedback process will be replicated a further four training task attempts. Participants in this group will therefore undergo a total of five training attempts of the needling task.
Treatment:
Other: Gaze training
Group Discovery
Active Comparator group
Description:
The discovery learning group will be given no video feedback and will be instructed to perform five training attempts at the needling task without further training or feedback.
Treatment:
Other: Discovery learning

Trial contacts and locations

0

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Central trial contact

David W Hewson, MBBS

Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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