Genetic Analysis of Hereditary Prostate Cancer

National Institutes of Health (NIH) logo

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Status

Completed

Conditions

Prostate Cancer

Study type

Observational

Funder types

NIH

Identifiers

NCT00001469
95-HG-0158
950158

Details and patient eligibility

About

Molecular approaches to the understanding of human neoplastic disease have revealed that multiple genetic alterations are an essential component of tumorigenesis. Both germline and somatic genetic alterations can be involved in the malignant transformation of normal cells. Identification of the genes involved in neoplastic transformation has been approached through the molecular analysis of sporadic cancers and the genetic study of families with an inherited predisposition for cancer. The interplay of these two approaches has led to the characterization of genes such as the retinoblastoma (Rb) gene, the p53 gene and the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene that are all involved in the development of both hereditary and non-hereditary forms of cancer. Inherited mutations in such genes predispose affected families to hereditary cancer syndromes, affording an opportunity to identify genetic lesions that also cause the more common sporadic cancers. Prostate cancer (PRCA) is the most common cancer diagnosed (1999 estimate 179,300 cases) and the second leading cause of cancer mortality (1999 estimate 37,000 deaths) in men in the United States. Family history is the single strongest risk factor currently known for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that heritable genetic factors may be involved in the development of this disease in a subset of men. The genetic contribution to diseases of complex origin such as cancer is often most salient in families of early onset cases. Therefore, prostate cancer inheritance following a simple Mendelian pattern may be identified in the families of probands with early-onset cases. Common susceptibility alleles of small effect may be detectable in families with later-onsent and/or less strong family history of PRCA or in case-control data.

Full description

Molecular approaches to the understanding of human neoplastic disease have revealed that multiple genetic alterations are an essential component of tumorigenesis. Both germline and somatic genetic alterations can be involved in the malignant transformation of normal cells. Identification of the genes involved in neoplastic transformation has been approached through the molecular analysis of sporadic cancers and the genetic study of families with an inherited predisposition for cancer. The interplay of these two approaches has led to the characterization of genes such as the retinoblastoma (Rb) gene, the p53 gene and the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene that are all involved in the development of both hereditary and non-hereditary forms of cancer. Inherited mutations in such genes predispose affected families to hereditary cancer syndromes, affording an opportunity to identify genetic lesions that also cause the more common sporadic cancers. Prostate cancer (PRCA) is the most common cancer diagnosed (1999 estimate 179,300 cases) and the second leading cause of cancer mortality (1999 estimate 37,000 deaths) in men in the United States. Family history is the single strongest risk factor currently known for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that heritable genetic factors may be involved in the development of this disease in a subset of men. The genetic contribution to diseases of complex origin such as cancer is often most salient in families of early onset cases. Therefore, prostate cancer inheritance following a simple Mendelian pattern, may be identified in the families of probands with early-onset cases. Common susceptibility alleles of small effect may be detectable in families with later-onset and/or less strong family history of PRCA or in case-control data.

Enrollment

7,776 patients

Sex

All

Ages

18+ years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion and exclusion criteria

  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

Enrollment in this study includes case-control data from men with prostate cancer and matched controls who are free from the disease, plus affected and unaffected individuals from families who meet the following criteria for Hereditary Prostate Cancer:

  1. A cluster of 3 or more first degree relatives, such as a father and 2 sons or 3 brothers
  2. The occurrence of prostate cancer in each of 3 generations in either the proband's paternal or maternal lineages
  3. Two first or second-degree relatives affected at an early age (age 55 years or younger).

Trial design

7,776 participants in 1 patient group

Specimens
Description:
Specimens

Trial contacts and locations

8

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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