Medication Reconciliation at Discharge: Impact on Patient's Care (CONCIVILLE)

C

Centre d'Investigation Clinique et Technologique 805

Status

Completed

Conditions

Medication Reconciliation

Treatments

Behavioral: Reconciliation

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT03029052
2016-A01628-43

Details and patient eligibility

About

Patient's discharge from hospital is associated with iatrogenic events for 12 to 17% of patients. This risk may be linked with discontinuity of care between hospital physicians and Primary Care Physician (PCP). The investigators aim to assess in this study the impact of medication reconciliation at discharge associated with a patient's counseling session, both provided by a pharmacist, on patient's care after discharge. To demonstrate the interest of medication reconciliation at discharge we expect a reduction by 15% of the number of prescription changes not maintained by the PCP after discharge.

Full description

Patient's discharge from hospital is associated with iatrogenic events for 12 to 17% of patients and may lead to further hospitalization. This risk may be linked with discontinuity of care between hospital physicians and Primary Care Physician (PCP) and from discrepancies between patient's current medications and drugs prescribed at discharge. Preventing adverse drug events (ADEs) remains a patient safety priority not only in hospitals but also across the continuum of care for patients. Implementing medication reconciliation at all transitions in care is an effective strategy for preventing discrepancies and ADEs. Medication reconciliation prevents and corrects medication errors by promoting transmissions of complete and accurate information about medicines. Furthermore, ADEs may be the result of a failure to understand and manage post-discharge care needs and can lead to hospital readmission. We assume that medication reconciliation at discharge, secondarily transmitted to the PCP with a discharge counseling session between the patient and a clinical pharmacist could have a positive impact on the maintenance of therapeutic optimization decided by in-hospital practitioners. In order to evaluate this assumption, we will conduct a randomized controlled study on 120 patients (as a reduction by 15% of the number of prescription changes not maintained by the PCP after discharge is expected). The follow-up will last 1 month after discharge from hospital. The first prescription from the PCP will be collected and analyzed. In addition, patients and PCPs will be contacted by the pharmacist to answer specific questionnaires. The primary objective of the study is to assess the impact of medication reconciliation at discharge associated with a patient's counseling session, both provided by a pharmacist, on patient's care after discharge.

Enrollment

120 patients

Sex

All

Ages

18 to 100 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • age ≥ 18 years old
  • hospitalized in infectious disease department
  • with a chronic disease and a current medical prescription including at least three drugs
  • discharged home or nursing home
  • not opposed to the study

Exclusion criteria

  • foreigners, patients under legal guardianship
  • advanced dementia (MMS<20) or phone tracking impossible
  • primary care physician opposed to answer questionnaire

Trial design

120 participants in 2 patient groups

Control group
No Intervention group
Description:
Medical and pharmaceutical management (at admission, during hospitalization and at discharge) will follow standard healthcare procedures of the department.
Reconciliation group
Experimental group
Description:
Standard healthcare procedures and pharmacist's involvement
Treatment:
Behavioral: Reconciliation

Trial contacts and locations

0

Loading...

Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

Clinical trials

Find clinical trialsTrials by location

Resources

© Copyright 2024 Veeva Systems