Molecular Mechanisms Leading to Chemoresistance in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (CHEMOVA)

T

Tampere University Hospital

Status

Active, not recruiting

Conditions

Ovarian Cancer

Study type

Observational

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT02758652
R15134

Details and patient eligibility

About

Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy in developed countries and the fifth most common cause of cancer-related death in women. Poor prognosis is due to challenges in early diagnosis and development of inevitable resistance to chemotherapy in majority of patients despite of good initial treatment response. The purpose of this prospective study is to analyze variation in microRNA expression in prediction of primary treatment response and the role of microRNAs in development of chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cancer. • Objectives: To screen microRNAs from prospectively collected plasma, urine and tumor samples from patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer. Samples are analyzed for microRNA expression and differential expression is correlated with primary treatment response, progression-free survival and overall survival. • Methods: Plasma, urine and tumor samples are collected at primary surgery (open surgery or diagnostic laparoscopy) or interval debulking surgery, at 1st, 3rd and 6th neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and at progression for high-throughput screening of microRNA expression by array technology.

Full description

Inclusion criteria: patients operated for a suspected ovarian malignancy in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Tampere University Informed consent obtained

Enrollment

160 patients

Sex

Female

Ages

18+ years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

18 years of age, informed consent.

Exclusion criteria

Informed consent not provided, age under 18 years.

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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