PARQUE 70+ Studying Sleep Disorder

U

University of Sao Paulo General Hospital

Status

Unknown

Conditions

Osteoarthritis
Sleep Disorder

Treatments

Behavioral: PARQVE Program
Behavioral: Geriatric Care

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT04059419
Cappesq 04019418.7.0000.0068

Details and patient eligibility

About

The emerging Brazilian population is accompanied by the emergence of patients in an age group, including osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal diseases, affecting 4% of the Brazilian population. By 2050, 30% of Brazil's population is over 60 years old. This has a higher degree of elderly with morbades as unbass on the association, such as osteoarthritis. Proper management of OA involves educational program, multidisciplinary team care and therapeutic maneuvers with weight loss and maintenance of mobility. Insomnia is the most frequent sleep disorder in the elderly and its execution almost always harms young women. Sleep quality is interfered with fatigue and pain exacerbation in people with OA, ie a sleep approach should be diagnosed in patients with comorbidity. In addition, chronic patients usually have insomnia and pressure in the use of opioids, sedatives and antidepressants, pointing to insomnia and mood swings for polypharmacy. To evaluate a quality of sleep as an intervention of the PARQVE 70+ Project. Prospective, case-control study. Patients over 70 years old treated at a geriatric outpatient clinic with eye or polyarticular osteoarthesis and clinical OA treatment indicator will be allocated and matched in two groups of 30 elderly. Patients underwent Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaires and the Epworth Scale before the study began, 3 and 6 months after PARQVE interventions and number of analysts, and compared those who did not perform an intervention. The study aims to improve sleep quality, decrease pain, reduce quality and decrease daytime sleepiness in elderly with OA.

Full description

The growing Brazilian population aging is accompanied by the emergence of common diseases in this age group, including osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent musculoskeletal disease, affecting 4% of the Brazilian population. There is important morbidity which progressively leads to chronic use of drugs harmful to this age group, such as anti-inflammatory drugs, increasing the risk of complications and pharmacological interactions. In addition to culminating with disabling functional impairment, osteoarthritis may progress, leading to the need for arthroplasty. Obesity and longevity are important risk factors for osteoarthritis, and both are very prevalent in Brazil. 2010 IBGE census progressions suggest a growing population increase, with 13% of the Brazilian population in 2018. By 2050, 30% of Brazil's population will be over 60 years old. This reflects a gradual increase in the elderly with common morbidities in this age group, such as osteoarthritis. Proper management of OA involves an educational program, multidisciplinary team care, and therapeutic measures aimed at weight loss and maintaining mobility. Insomnia is the most frequent sleep disorder in the elderly and its prevalence almost doubles compared to young adults. In addition to aging, other factors such as the presence of clinical comorbidities, including OA, psychiatric disorders, primary sleep disorders and poor habits (poor sleep hygiene) contribute to this prevalence. During the aging process, in addition to increased nighttime awakenings and increased total waking time at night, there is a reduction in time spent in the deepest stages of sleep, which may be compromised in the presence of pain. Sleep quality is affected by severe fatigue and pain exacerbation in people with OA, ie the sleep approach should always be considered in patients with such comorbidity. In addition to OA, patients with chronic pain usually have insomnia and depression, increasing the use of opioids, sedatives and antidepressants, indicating insomnia and mood changes contributing factors to polypharmacy. A systematic review of chronic OA pain and spinal pain suggests that interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy and sleep hygiene have good repercussions in people with OA. The study of sleep improvement can facilitate the elderly's quality of life, decrease pain and reduce polypharmacy. This study aims to evaluate the improvement of sleep quality and decrease of daytime sleepiness in elderly with OA.

Enrollment

60 estimated patients

Sex

All

Ages

60+ years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Classified as Kelgreen and Lawrence grades I to III (K-L), ie any degree of gonarthritis without obliteration of the joint space;
  • Indication of clinical treatment of OA;
  • Patients without moderate to advanced dementia syndrome;
  • Patients without neuropsychiatric diseases whose symptoms may impair the assimilation of the given guidelines.

Exclusion criteria

  • Missing interventions and not performing the tasks determined by professionals;
  • Patients with low family support;
  • Prescription in the last three months, during the study, some type of hypnotic or sleep inducing medication, which may interfere with the study analysis.

Trial design

60 participants in 2 patient groups

Experimental
Experimental group
Description:
30 Patients will participate in two days of lectures two-months apart on the subject of knee OA, but will also come to the hospital at months 1, 3 and 5 after the first class to consult about nutritional habits to be improved; at months 4 and 6 to participate in a group therapy session with the psychologists, 7 sessions with the physical therapy team followed by 7 sessions with the physical educators team (once a week/4 weeks and once every two weeks, three times).
Treatment:
Behavioral: PARQVE Program
Control
Active Comparator group
Description:
Should remain under geriatric care after randomization.
Treatment:
Behavioral: Geriatric Care

Trial contacts and locations

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Central trial contact

Livia Abreu

Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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