Pneumatic Reduction For Intussusception In Children: A Retrospective Cohort Study

N

National Children's Hospital, Vietnam

Status

Completed

Conditions

Intussusception

Treatments

Procedure: Fluoroscopic-guided air-enema reduction (FGAR)

Study type

Observational

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT06365333
1451_04/BVNTW-VNCSKTE

Details and patient eligibility

About

In pediatric patients, intussusception predominantly occurs in the ileocecal region, with over 90% of cases lacking identifiable causative factors, initiating through peristalsis-driven invagination of bowel segments leading to compromised blood flow and subsequent bowel edema. Persistent obstruction may progress to bowel ischemia and infarction. Vietnam exhibits a higher incidence of intussusception compared to other countries, albeit with similar clinical presentations and anatomical locations, hinting at shared pathophysiology. Despite evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of non-surgical reduction techniques, many medical centers in low- to middle-income countries (LMICs) have not adopted these methods, resulting in unnecessary surgical interventions. The Vietnam National Hospital of Pediatrics (NCH) has employed air enema reduction since the early 2000s but lacks a comprehensive study on fluoroscopic-guided air-enema reduction (FGAR) techniques or success rates. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the long-term outcomes of pneumatic reduction for intussusception at NCH, a high-volume institution in a lower-middle-income country.

Full description

In pediatric patients, intussusception primarily occurs in the ileocecal region, with more than 90% of cases lacking identifiable causative factors. The invagination of bowel segments is propelled by peristalsis, leading to compromised blood flow. This venous occlusion precipitates bowel edema, and if the obstruction persists, it can progress to bowel ischemia and infarction. The incidence of intussusception in Vietnam exceeds that of any other country with available data on incidence rates. Despite variations in incidence rates, intussusception's clinical presentation and anatomical location remain largely consistent between Vietnam and other countries, suggesting a common underlying pathophysiology. Many medical centers in low- to middle-income countries (LMICs) have yet to adopt these non-surgical approaches, resulting in unnecessary surgical interventions for a significant portion of patients. At the Vietnam National Hospital of Pediatrics (NCH), air enema reduction has been a standard practice since the early 2000s. Nonetheless, there has been no comprehensive study delineating the technique of fluoroscopic-guided air-enema reduction (FGAR) at NCH, nor assessing its success rate.

Enrollment

3,562 patients

Sex

All

Ages

2 to 30 months old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • All patients diagnosed with idiopathic intussusception, admitted to the National Children's Hospital between January 2016 and December 2017, exhibiting clinical signs and symptoms consistent with intussusception, and confirmed via ultrasound examination.
  • Fluoroscopy-guided pneumatic reduction was performed with a maximum of three attempts. Patients who did not respond to pneumatic reduction underwent minimally invasive surgical intervention, either laparoscopic reduction or trans-umbilical mini-open reduction.

Exclusion criteria

  • Patients demonstrating clinical instability characterized by signs of peritonitis or intestinal perforation necessitating conventional laparotomy.
  • Patients deemed unsuitable for air enema reduction due to a grossly distended abdomen or compromised cardiopulmonary function.

Trial design

3,562 participants in 1 patient group

FGAR-treated
Description:
Patients diagnosed with idiopathic intussusception, admitted to the National Children's Hospital between January 2016 and December 2017, exhibiting clinical signs and symptoms consistent with intussusception, and confirmed via ultrasound examination
Treatment:
Procedure: Fluoroscopic-guided air-enema reduction (FGAR)

Trial contacts and locations

2

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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