Substance-focused SBI as a Complement to Internet-based Psychiatric Treatment: RCT (eScreeniPsy)

Karolinska Institute logo

Karolinska Institute

Status

Completed

Conditions

Substance Use Disorders (SUD)

Treatments

Behavioral: Internet-based treatment for depression or anxiety
Behavioral: Assessment only of alcohol and drug use.
Behavioral: eScreen

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT01885026
KI 4-2007/2013 (Other Identifier)
2012/1138-31/1

Details and patient eligibility

About

Objectives: This study evaluates the efficacy of eScreen for internet psychiatry patients treated for major depressive disorder, panic anxiety and social phobia. The eScreen brief Internet intervention for problematic alcohol and drug use offers self-screening, in-depth self-reporting, personalized feedback and treatment recommendations as well as an electronic diary. Progress over time is shown in diagrams detailing consumption levels. Method: This is a two-armed randomized controlled design, measuring outcomes in terms of changes in problematic alcohol use up to one year after study recruitment. Participants with problematic alcohol use (AUDIT >7 for men and >5 for women) and/or problematic drug use (DUDIT > 1 for both men and women) are randomized into one of two groups: T1, eScreen referral or Control group. Outcomes on alcohol and drug use as well as health-related symptoms are assessed after 3, 6 and 12 months. The hypothesis is that the group receiving the eScreen intervention will reduce their alcohol/drug use to a larger extent than the control group at follow-up compared to the baseline level.

Full description

This study evaluated the efficacy of eScreen for internet psychiatry patients treated for major depressive disorder, panic anxiety and social phobia. The eScreen brief Internet intervention for problematic alcohol and drug use offers self-screening, in-depth self-reporting, personalized feedback and treatment recommendations as well as an electronic diary. Progress over time is shown in diagrams detailing consumption levels. The design was a two-armed randomized controlled design, measuring outcomes in terms of changes in problematic alcohol use up to one year after study recruitment. Participants with problematic alcohol use (AUDIT >7 for men and >5 for women) and/or problematic drug use (DUDIT > 1 for both men and women) were randomized into one of two groups: T1, eScreen referral or Control group. Outcomes on alcohol and drug use as well as health-related symptoms are assessed after 3, 6 and 12 months. The hypothesis was that the group receiving the eScreen intervention would reduce their alcohol/drug use to a larger extent than the control group at follow-up compared to the baseline level. The results have not yet been analyzed due to technical issues. However, qualitative interviews have been conducted with participants and our intention is to publish the qualitative results in tandem with the quantitative results available.

Enrollment

93 patients

Sex

All

Ages

15+ years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

AUDIT >7 for men and AUDIT >5 for women, and/or DUDIT >0

Exclusion criteria

DUDIT = 0 and AUDIT <8 (men) or <6 (women)

Trial design

Primary purpose

Treatment

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Single Blind

93 participants in 2 patient groups

eScreen
Experimental group
Description:
Web based self-monitoring of problematic alcohol and drug use, and Internet-based treatment for depression or anxiety
Treatment:
Behavioral: eScreen
Behavioral: Internet-based treatment for depression or anxiety
Control
Experimental group
Description:
Assessment only of alcohol and drug use and Internet-based treatment for depression or anxiety
Treatment:
Behavioral: Assessment only of alcohol and drug use.
Behavioral: Internet-based treatment for depression or anxiety

Trial contacts and locations

1

Loading...

Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

Clinical trials

Find clinical trialsTrials by location
© Copyright 2024 Veeva Systems