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Clinical Success Rate of Anterior and Posterior Crowns in a Group of Children Treated Under General Anesthesia

Cairo University (CU) logo

Cairo University (CU)

Status

Not yet enrolling

Conditions

Prosthesis Failure, Dental

Treatments

Procedure: anterior and posterior full coverage crowns

Study type

Observational

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT06201481
Success Rate in Dental GA

Details and patient eligibility

About

  • This prospective cohort study aims to evaluate the clinical success rate of anterior and posterior full-coverage restorations among a group of Egyptian children treated under general anesthesia.
  • The main question it aims to answer:

In A Group of Children, What Is the Clinical Success Rate of Anterior and Posterior Full Coverage Restorations Performed Under General Anesthesia?

Full description

This study consisted of clinical examinations of the participants treated under general anesthesia to evaluate the clinical success of anterior and posterior crowns that will be performed on the day of the dental treatment, then after 15 days, 3, 6, and 12 months recall examinations.

  • The level of parental satisfaction will be evaluated through a questionnaire that will be completed on the day of the general anesthesia session.

Enrollment

100 estimated patients

Sex

All

Ages

2 to 5 years old

Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Children aged between 2 and 5 years old.
  • Children classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists class I; Healthy (no acute or chronic disease, normal BMI percentile for age)

Exclusion criteria

  • Children with mental or neurological disorders.
  • Children with developmental disorders and syndromes.
  • Children whose parents have no mobile phone access.

Trial contacts and locations

0

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Central trial contact

Salma Sayed, B.D.S; Hanaa Abdelmoniem, PhD

Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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