Telehealth in the Rehabilitation of Urinary Incontinence in Older Women

F

Federal University of Health Science of Porto Alegre

Status

Active, not recruiting

Conditions

Urinary Incontinence in Old Age

Treatments

Other: Pelvic physiotherapy

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT06200922
UFCSPAUI

Details and patient eligibility

About

The goal of this randomized clinical trial is to compare the effectiveness of a pelvic floor rehabilitation program in a face-to-face versus remote in community-dwelling elderly women with urinary incontinence. The main question it aims to answer is: What is the difference in effectiveness of a pelvic floor rehabilitation program through face-to-face versus remote intervention? Participants will be divided into three groups: Synchronous Group: will receive guidance and perform a real-time guided pelvic physiotherapy protocol through online physiotherapy by the physiotherapist, Asynchronous Group: will receive guidance and perform a pelvic physiotherapy protocol after the evaluation, without the real-time monitoring by the physical therapist and face-to-face group: will receive guidelines and will perform a pelvic physiotherapy protocol oriented in person by the physical therapist. All groups will receive the same treatment for 12 weeks, which will include floor muscle training pelvic floor, urge suppression techniques, bladder training and behavioral therapy. Participants will be evaluated pre-treatment, at the end of the 6th week, and at the end of 12 weeks.

Full description

Aging is associated with changes in body composition, including a decrease in skeletal muscle mass. As a result, approximately 30-40% of the elderly may experience urinary incontinence, considered one of the most important geriatric syndromes, associated with a negative impact on quality of life. In clinical practice, pelvic floor muscle training and behavioral therapy promote positive effects on pelvic floor rehabilitation when performed and guided through face-to-face consultations. Through Telehealth, the aspects that refer to the role of the physiotherapist, technologies used and format of the approach do not seem to be clarified. Virtual home care is an accepted reality because it improves access to health care and has a positive effect on outcomes. However, barriers to its use can affect the accessibility. According to the World Health Organization, the definition of telehealth is "the provision of health services, where distance is a critical factor, by all health professionals, using information and communication technologies to exchange valid information for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease and injury, research and evaluation, and for the continuing education of health professionals, all in the interest of promoting the health of individuals and their communities". The World Confederation for Physical Therapy defines digital practice, "a term used to describe health services, support, and information provided remotely through digital communication and devices." The main objective is "to facilitate the effective delivery of Physical Therapy services, improving access to care and information, and managing health resources". In Brazil, the Federal Council of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy published the resolution for the practice of telehealth in a pandemic period, teleconsultation, telemonitoring and teleconsultation. Our hypothesis is that the synchronous and asynchronous communication between the physiotherapist and the participants, with or without the help of caregivers, may enable adherence to the home rehabilitation process when compared to face-to-face treatment, minimizing the effects of urinary incontinence. This study proposes to contribute to knowledge in the field of Pelvic Physiotherapy, in particular, through telehealth to provide the service of rehabilitation for elderly women with pelvic floor disorders, using the advancement of technology as a facilitator of synchronous and asynchronous communication, to approach elderly urinary incontinence and still compare the two forms of rehabilitation through telehealth with the face-to-face treatment. It is widely known that urinary incontinence is a factor of social inhibition for causing embarrassment, in addition to producing disturbance in the sleep in the face of increased nocturnal voiding frequency, directly affecting the quality of life of the elderly. The proposed safe and guided by a physiotherapist through three rehabilitation programs, synchronous telerehabilitation (in real time), asynchronous telerehabilitation (without real-time contact) and face-to-face rehabilitation, can be used to provide interventions in order to optimize health-related quality of life.

Enrollment

69 estimated patients

Sex

Female

Ages

60 to 100 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • 60 years old or more;
  • Urinary Incontinence for at least 12 months
  • Internet access.

Exclusion criteria

  • Pelvic cancer;
  • Sling surgery;
  • Urinary catheter;
  • Antimuscarinic medication;
  • Alzheimer;
  • Parkinson;
  • Multiple Sclerosis;
  • Uncontrolled diabetes.

Trial design

Primary purpose

Treatment

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

Single Blind

69 participants in 3 patient groups

Synchronous Group
Experimental group
Description:
Will receive guidance and perform a real-time guided pelvic physiotherapy protocol through online physiotherapy by the physiotherapist.
Treatment:
Other: Pelvic physiotherapy
Asynchronous Group
Experimental group
Description:
Will receive guidance and perform a pelvic physiotherapy protocol after the evaluation, without the real-time monitoring by the physical therapist
Treatment:
Other: Pelvic physiotherapy
Face-to-face group
Active Comparator group
Description:
Will receive guidelines and will perform a pelvic physiotherapy protocol oriented in person by the physical therapist.
Treatment:
Other: Pelvic physiotherapy

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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