The 'Bekele Afessa Scan-Teach-Treat Approach'

U

University of Salzburg

Status

Unknown

Conditions

Infection
Sepsis

Treatments

Behavioral: simple infection management protocol

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT02697513
V01

Details and patient eligibility

About

Infection and sepsis are among the leading causes of death worldwide, particularly in middle- and low-income countries.The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has launched an initiative to improve sepsis care in resource-limited settings by employing the 'Scan-Teach-Treat' Approach. In this prospective before-after study, three interventions will be performed: First four months period: collection of baseline data on the clinical management of patients with acute infection. Second four months period: During the first days, a 1.5-day focused training program will be performed (participants: health care workers of primary care facilities within the catchment area of the Gitwe hospital and health care workers of the Gitwe hospital). Then, a simple management protocol to care for patients with an acute infection will be implemented into clinical practice. During the third four months period, a 'Sepsis First Aid' kit containing essential resources to treat patients with an acute infection (antimicrobials, fluids, data documentation sheet) will be distributed to primary care facilities and the emergency department of the Gitwe hospital. During the 8 months following the focused training program (periods 2 and 3), data collection will continue. It is hypothesized that implementation of a simple clinical management protocol and exposure of health care workers in the Gitwe Hospital area to a focused training program on the management of acute infections will increase the rate of evidence-based interventions performed in patients with an acute infection during the first six hours after hospital admission (administration of oxygen and fluids whenever indicated, timely administration of antimicrobial drugs, source control measures).

Full description

Infection and sepsis are among the leading causes of death worldwide. The annual burden of infectious diseases is particularly high in middle- and low-income countries. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign released guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock management, whose implementation improved sepsis outcomes. Despite these benefits, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign cannot be implemented in middle- or low-income countries due to lack of training and resources. This leaves those clinicians caring for the worldwide majority of patients suffering from acute infection without standardized and adoptable guidance for sepsis. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has launched an initiative to improve sepsis care in resource-limited settings by employing the 'Scan-Teach-Treat' Approach. This approach consists of the following three steps: Step 1 - scanning the region of interest for key elements of regional epidemiology of acute infectious diseases as well as elements of the teach and treat module; Step 2 - implementing a focused training program on the management of acute infectious diseases; Step 3 - implementing a 'Sepsis First Aid kit' into clinical practice. In this prospective before-after study, this approach will be piloted at the Gitwe Distict Hospital in Gitwe, rural Rwanda. During three four month periods, three interventions are planned: First four months period: collection of baseline data on the clinical management of patients with acute infection. Second four months period: During the first days, a 1.5-day focused training program will be performed (participants: health care workers of primary care facilities within the catchment area of the Gitwe hospital and health care workers of the Gitwe hospital). Then, a simple management protocol to care for patients with an acute infection will be implemented into clinical practice. During the third four months period, a 'Sepsis First Aid' kit containing essential resources to treat patients with an acute infection (antimicrobials, fluids, data documentation sheet) will be distributed to primary care facilities and the emergency department of the Gitwe hospital. During the 8 months following the focused training program (periods 2 and 3), data collection will continue. It is hypothesized that implementation of a simple clinical management protocol and exposure of health care workers in the Gitwe Hospital area to a focused training program on the management of acute infections will increase the rate of evidence-based interventions performed in patients with an acute infection during the first six hours after hospital admission (administration of oxygen and fluids whenever indicated, timely administration of antimicrobial drugs, source control measures). In addition to the main analysis, study endpoints will be analyzed separately for the following á priori defined sub-groups: children (<15 years); patients with malaria; patients positive for HIV; patients referred to from primary health care centers.

Enrollment

1,594 patients

Sex

All

Ages

4+ weeks old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

all patients admitted to Gitwe Hospital because of a suspected or confirmed acute infectious disease

Exclusion criteria

  • age <28 days of life
  • known allergy to any study-related drug
  • limited therapy due to terminal disease
  • refusal of written informed consent

Trial design

Primary purpose

Treatment

Allocation

Non-Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

None (Open label)

1,594 participants in 2 patient groups

Before Period
No Intervention group
Description:
Collection of patient-related data without interventions being made
After Period
Active Comparator group
Description:
Implementation of a simple infection management protocol as well as a 'Sepsis First Aid' kit to assist in the management of patients with acute infection
Treatment:
Behavioral: simple infection management protocol

Trial contacts and locations

0

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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