The Effect of Home Exercise Programs Applied of Congenital Muscular Torticollis.

G

Gazi University

Status

Enrolling

Conditions

Family Members
Congenital Muscular Torticollis

Treatments

Behavioral: Exercise and home program to increase lateral flexion and rotation angles

Study type

Observational

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT06225934
muscular torticollis

Details and patient eligibility

About

Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is the third most common musculoskeletal disorder of infancy, affecting 3.9% to 16% of infants. It develops due to unilateral shortening of the SCM, whether or not there is a mass in the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). CMT is characterized by lateral flexion of the affected SCM to the ipsilateral side and rotation to the contralateral side. Its etiology is not fully known. However, it can be associated with SCM disorder that develops due to birth trauma, prenatal/perinatal compartment syndrome and intrauterine restriction. It has been reported that conditions such as multiple pregnancy, intrauterine stenosis, vascular causes, fibrosis of the peripartum bleeding area, use of forceps at birth, difficult birth, and primary myopathy of SCM increase the possibility of CMT. It is necessary to approach babies diagnosed with CMT with an effective treatment program. The most important and effective of these approaches is to provide the necessary education and an intensive home program to their families, with whom they spend most of their days. By educating the family, on the one hand, the baby will receive regular treatment and the family's communication with the baby will be strengthened, while on the other hand, limitations such as transportation, time and cost will be eliminated. In our study; It was aimed to examine the effectiveness of the home program given in cooperation with the family in babies diagnosed with CMT and to create a new protocol.

Full description

Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is the third most common musculoskeletal disorder of infancy, affecting 3.9% to 16% of infants. It develops due to unilateral shortening of the SCM, whether or not there is a mass in the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). CMT is characterized by lateral flexion of the affected SCM to the ipsilateral side and rotation to the contralateral side. Its etiology is not fully known. However, it can be associated with SCM disorder that develops due to birth trauma, prenatal/perinatal compartment syndrome and intrauterine restriction. It has been reported that conditions such as multiple pregnancy, intrauterine stenosis, vascular causes, fibrosis of the peripartum bleeding area, use of forceps at birth, difficult birth, and primary myopathy of SCM increase the possibility of CMT. These conditions cause degeneration of SCM fibers, edema in SCM, and fibrosis, as well as the general posture seen in SCM. Although CMT seems to be a condition that only concerns the neck muscles; In later periods, it may cause permanent disorders in body biomechanics such as asymmetry in the use of the upper extremities, delay in gross motor functions, postural disorders such as plagiocephaly and scoliosis, and balance disorders. Therefore, babies diagnosed with CMT should be included in a comprehensive and regular physiotherapy and rehabilitation program from the early period. These programs generally include joint range of motion-stretching exercises for the neck, family education including teaching the principles of holding and carrying, approaches such as microcurrent applications and taping, and in more severe cases, botulinum toxin-A (BOTOX-A) or surgical applications. It is necessary to approach babies diagnosed with CMT with an effective treatment program. The most important and effective of these approaches is to provide the necessary education and an intensive home program to their families, with whom they spend most of their days. By educating the family, on the one hand, the baby will receive regular treatment and the family's communication with the baby will be strengthened, while on the other hand, limitations such as transportation, time and cost will be eliminated. In our study; It was aimed to examine the effectiveness of the home program given in cooperation with the family in babies diagnosed with CMT and to create a new protocol. In our study; It is aimed to examine the effect of the home program given to babies diagnosed with Congenital Muscular Torticollis (CMT) between the ages of 0-12 months, in cooperation with the family, on the treatment of CMT and to contribute to the literature with this approach that can be used by clinicians by creating a treatment protocol for this.

Enrollment

15 estimated patients

Sex

All

Ages

1 to 12 months old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Babies aged 0-12 months with a diagnosis of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT)
  • Families who agree to participate in the study will be included in the exercise program

Exclusion criteria

  • Those who have any neurological risk factors were included in the study,
  • Those who are affected by their visual/hearing senses,
  • Those who have not been diagnosed with Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) by a doctor,
  • Those who have previously received treatment for the diagnosis of CMT,
  • Babies with a history of BOTOX-A/surgery applied to the Sternocleidomastoid (SKM) muscle before treatment will not be included.

Trial design

15 participants in 1 patient group

congenital muscular torticollis
Description:
Babies diagnosed with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) who agree to participate in the study and meet the inclusion criteria will be included in the study without using any sample selection method, since it is a single-arm study. The parents of each baby will first be informed about the content of the study and will read and sign the consent form stating that they participate in the study voluntarily.
Treatment:
Behavioral: Exercise and home program to increase lateral flexion and rotation angles

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Central trial contact

Rabia ZORLULAR; Sinem ERTURAN

Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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