The Effect of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy on Insulin Secretion Pattern in Morbidly Obese Patients With Acanthosis Nigricans

S

Shen Qu

Status

Enrolling

Conditions

Bariatric Surgery Candidate
Insulin Resistance
Morbid Obesity
Insulin Sensitivity
Acanthosis Nigricans

Treatments

Procedure: LSG

Study type

Observational

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT05529563
Acanthosis Nigricans

Details and patient eligibility

About

Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is increasing in its prevalence and is the most prevalent cutaneous manifestation in individuals with obesity. Insulin resistance or hyperinsulinemia is the main pathophysiological mechanism of obesity-related AN. However, the effect of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) on insulin secretion pattern in Chinese morbidly obese patients with AN is unknown. In these study, the investigators aimed to explore the insulin secretion patterns in Chinese morbidly obese patients with Acanthosis nigricans (AN) and their alterations after LSG.

Enrollment

138 estimated patients

Sex

All

Ages

18 to 65 years old

Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • aged 18 to 65 years
  • BMI equal or greater than 35 kg/m2
  • completed a 75-g OGTT and insulin release assay
  • eligible for the 12-month follow-up.

Exclusion criteria

  • severe liver and renal dysfunction, preexisting heart disease, malignancy, or endocrine diseases such as pituitary adenoma and hypogonadism
  • mental illness
  • genetic disease
  • current or previous treatment that might affect the sex hormones and insulin secretion
  • gestation or lactation
  • loss to follow-up, or withdrawal from the study
  • unable to understand and comply with the study protocol.

Trial design

138 participants in 1 patient group

obesity without AN (OB group) and obesity with AN (AN group)
Description:
LSG
Treatment:
Procedure: LSG

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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