The Effect of Self-made Fetal Movement and Position Tracking During Pregnancy on Maternal Attachment

A

AYSUN BADEM

Status

Completed

Conditions

Attachment
Maternal Behavior

Treatments

Behavioral: Fetal movement and position tracking training

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT05443152
Maternal attachment

Details and patient eligibility

About

This study was conducted to determine the effect of self-made fetal movement counting and fetal position tracking on maternal attachment in prenatal period.

Full description

The first attachment between mother and baby begins in the prenatal period. It is expected to increase as pregnancy progresses.The more the mother tries to communicate and interact with her baby, the stronger her attachment to her baby. The baby can be accepted by the mother as an individual, and the attachment between the mother and baby can increase.The early development of safe and positive attachment composes the basis of healthy development. In the later years of childhood, safe attachment is effective on healthy processes, such as being more positive, establishing close, constructive and respectful relationships, and a high sense of trust, while unsafe attachment is associated with emotional, social, physical and mental psychopathologies. The mother's touching her baby over her abdomen, trying to guess the parts of the baby, following baby movements, communicating with the baby by focusing and spending private time with the baby increase the physical and psychological contact with the baby. Fetal movement counting is defined as tracking uninterrupted fetal movements for at least 15-20 minutes by lying on the left side in a calm environment at any time during the day when this baby is awake. Fetal position tracking is described as trying to guess the parts of the baby by placing the mother's hand on the abdomen. In the literature, it is stated that prenatal attachment affects postpartum maternal attachment, contributes positively to infant care and provides rapid adaptation to motherhood. In addition, secure/insecure attachment styles are thought to be associated with postpartum depression. It is stated that the babies of mothers with strong prenatal attachment show healthier growth and development and even affect their personality positively in adulthood. In the literature, it is stated that the prenatal period can be an indicator of mother-infant interaction in the postpartum period.This study was carried out as a continuation of the previous study, NCT05313113 Clinical ID, to determine maternal attachment in the postpartum period of pregnant women whose fetal movement and position were followed.

Enrollment

85 patients

Sex

Female

Ages

19 to 35 years old

Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • literate
  • between the ages of 19-35
  • Effective communication
  • first pregnancy
  • having a single fetus
  • Pregnancy week between 24 and 28. between the ages of 19-35
  • Effective communication
  • first pregnancy
  • having a single fetus
  • Pregnancy week between 24 and 28.

Exclusion criteria

  • Pregnancy using assisted reproductive techniques
  • Having a risky pregnancy (preeclampsia, placenta previa, gestational diabetes etc.)
  • Pregnant women with a chronic disease (heart, systemic, circulatory disorder, psychiatric, etc.) were not included in the study.

Trial design

Primary purpose

Supportive Care

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Parallel Assignment

Masking

None (Open label)

85 participants in 2 patient groups

Experimental Arms
Experimental group
Description:
Prenatal attachment scale answered. In the first stage, pregnant women were trained to implement fetal movement count and position tracking. The training was provided face to face and lasted 30-45 minutes. How to determine the position of the fetus and I. and II. Leopold maneuvers are also taught. In the second stage, the pregnant women were interviewed twice a week by telephone.Thus, it was provided that pregnant women had fetal tracked at least once a day, at any time of the day, when the fetus was awake and most active, in a suitable position and a comfortable environment, for at least 15-20 minutes continuously for four weeks. Pregnant women phoned the researcher when they wanted. At the same time, the participants continued to their routine prenatal care. The mother attachment scale was answered at least 1 month after the birth of the women.
Treatment:
Behavioral: Fetal movement and position tracking training
No İntervention Arms
No Intervention group
Description:
Prenatal attachment scale answered. The pregnant women continued to their routine prenatal care. No intervention was applied to the pregnant women in addition to their routine prenatal care.The pregnant women were called about whether continuing their routine care or having any problems during the research. The mother attachment scale was answered at least 1 month after the birth of the women.

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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