The Effect of the Distance Between Mesh and the Urethra on Sexuality in Patients Who Underwent Transobturator Tape.

P

Prof. Dr. Cemil Tascıoglu Education and Research Hospital Organization

Status

Completed

Conditions

Ultrasonography
Sexual Dysfunction
Urinary Incontinence

Treatments

Procedure: transobturator tape

Study type

Observational

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT06211894
e27

Details and patient eligibility

About

Urinary incontinence, commonly observed among women aged 30 to 60, encompasses Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI), responsible for the majority of cases. This condition significantly affects the quality of life, influencing physical, emotional, and sexual aspects. Severe cases impact libido and cause vaginal dryness, affecting not just sexual function but also relationships, leading to an overall decline in quality of life. Hence, examining sexual functions in those affected by SUI holds significance. The study aimed to evaluate the impact of mesh-urethra distance on sexual functions using perineal ultrasound in continent patients post-transobturator tape (TOT) surgery for isolated SUI. Patients achieving continence post-surgery were categorized based on the distance from the posterior of the urethra at the bladder neck to the nearest proximal edge of the tape: \< 5 mm and \> 5 mm. Questionnaires, including the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and The Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF), were administered preoperatively and at the 6-month postoperative follow-up.

Full description

Urinary incontinence, often seen in women aged 30 to 60, involves Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) in most cases. It significantly affects life, impacting physical, emotional, and sexual well-being. Severe cases can lower sex drive and cause vaginal dryness, affecting not just the individual's sex life but also relationships, leading to a lower quality of life overall. That's why looking at how SUI affects sexual aspects is crucial. The study aimed to see how the distance between the mesh and urethra after transobturator tape (TOT) surgery might affect sexual function in patients who no longer experienced incontinence. Patients were divided based on this distance, and surveys like the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and The Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF) were used before and six months after surgery.

Enrollment

80 patients

Sex

Female

Ages

18 to 45 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

-Continent patients ages 18 to 45 who underwent mid-urethral sling (MUS) surgery due to isolated SUI were included in the study

Exclusion criteria

  • Patients who experienced surgical failure in incontinence surgery,
  • who had undergone previous vaginal surgeries, who had a history of hysterectomy,
  • who underwent additional surgeries during the same session,
  • who had pelvic organ prolapse, who had received radiation therapy,
  • who had a diagnosis of malignancy,
  • who were menopausal, who received external hormone treatment,
  • who were sexually inactive, whose partners had erectile dysfunction,
  • who did not attend postoperative follow-up appointments,
  • who became postoperatively pregnant,
  • who had undergone non-synthetic mesh (autologous fascia) surgery for SUI were excluded from the study.

Trial design

80 participants in 2 patient groups

the urethra at the bladder neck to the nearest proximal edge of the tape: < 5 mm
Description:
Patients who achieved continence after surgery were split into two subgroups based on the distance from the posterior of the urethra at the bladder neck to the nearest proximal edge of the tape: < 5 mm and >5 mm. The position of the sling along the urethra was measured as a percentage of urethral length and referred to as the sling percentile. This measurement was calculated as follows: the proximal urethral length (distance from the sling's proximal point to the bladder neck) divided by the total urethral length (distance from the bladder neck to the external urethral meatus) on the sagittal plane, where the bladder neck and the external urethral meatus represent 0% and 100% of urethral length, respectively. Additionally, perineal ultrasound was used to evaluate various parameters including bladder descent, pubo-urethral distance, urethral thickness, detrusor thickness, cystocele descent, rectal descent, and uterine descent.
Treatment:
Procedure: transobturator tape
the urethra at the bladder neck to the nearest proximal edge of the tape: > 5 mm
Description:
Patients who achieved continence after surgery were split into two subgroups based on the distance from the posterior of the urethra at the bladder neck to the nearest proximal edge of the tape: < 5 mm and >5 mm. The position of the sling along the urethra was measured as a percentage of urethral length and referred to as the sling percentile. This measurement was calculated as follows: the proximal urethral length (distance from the sling's proximal point to the bladder neck) divided by the total urethral length (distance from the bladder neck to the external urethral meatus) on the sagittal plane, where the bladder neck and the external urethral meatus represent 0% and 100% of urethral length, respectively. Additionally, perineal ultrasound was used to evaluate various parameters including bladder descent, pubo-urethral distance, urethral thickness, detrusor thickness, cystocele descent, rectal descent, and uterine descent.
Treatment:
Procedure: transobturator tape

Trial contacts and locations

2

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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