The Effects of a Nurse-led Case Management Programme on Home Exercise Training for Haemodialysis Patients

T

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Status

Completed

Conditions

Kidney Disease

Treatments

Other: Brief group exercise
Behavioral: Nurse-led interviewing

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT02075879
HSEARS20121105002

Details and patient eligibility

About

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a nurse-led case management programme on home exercise training for haemodialysis patients. We hypothesised that: a. There is no significant difference in physical functioning between participants receiving the nurse-led home exercise training programme and those receiving the comparison care. b. There is no difference in depression between participants receiving the nurse-led home exercise training programme and those receiving the comparison care. c. There is no difference in quality of life and health perception between participants receiving the nurse-led home exercise training programme and those receiving the comparison care. d. There is no difference in physical activity levels between participants receiving the nurse-led home exercise training programme and those receiving the comparison care. e. There is no difference in perceived benefits and barriers of exercise between participants receiving the nurse-led home exercise training programme and those receiving the comparison care. The study was a randomized controlled trial conducted in two haemodialysis units of two tertiary hospitals in Nanjing, China. Participants were randomly assigned to either study group or comparison group. Participants in both groups received the in-center exercise training (20 minutes) before haemodialysis sessions weekly for 6 weeks and were instructed to perform exercise at home. The in-center training was focused on flexibility and strengthening exercise. Patients were encouraged to have cardiovascular exercises at home which will improve their cardiovascular conditions and endurance. The list of cardiovascular exercise included brisk walking, bicycling, jogging. Participants in the study group were instructed to start walking or brisk walking at low duration and gradually progress to a maximum of 30 minutes daily per week. To facilitate exercise progression, the nurse case managers discussed exercise benefits, explored exercise barriers and developed mutual goals with patients. The nurse motivated them and checked the exercise behaviors to ensure adherence to the recommended exercise regime. The nurse case managers interviewed the study group patients weekly for six weeks and biweekly for another six weeks. Participants in the comparison group only participated in the in-center exercise training. The comparison group patients received usual care from the nurse without the interviews and mutual goals developed.

Full description

The duration of interventions was 12 weeks. In-center exercise training sessions were available for all participants once a week for 6 weeks. Each session lasted about 20 minutes. Participants were instructed to perform flexibility and strength exercise in centres prior to the haemodialysis session. The researcher performed exercises with the participants and emphasised the importance of self-monitoring during the sessions. Symptoms (such as chest pain, dyspnea, dizziness, and leg cramps) and vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse) were checked before exercise and monitored during the entire exercise session. Participants were instructed to self-monitor exercise intensity. The exercise programme was pause immediately if the patient was feeling short of breath, chest pain or pressure, irregular heartbeats, leg cramps, dizziness or lightheadedness, blurring of vision, or any discomfort. Intervention group During the study period, participants in the intervention group received additional face-to-face interviews conducted by the designated case managers every week for six weeks and biweekly for another six weeks. During interviews, patients were instructed to start aerobic exercise, such as walking, jogging, cycling, or brisk walking at home at low duration and gradually progress to a maximum of 30 minutes daily per week. Apart from aerobic exercise, patients were recommended to perform strength exercises twice a week and flexibility exercises for every day. The key elements of the interview included: 1) assessment of patients' knowledge and exercise behaviour; examining patients' attitudes and feelings about being physical activity; 2) explore patients' barriers to exercise and perceived benefits; 3) patient education on the benefits of exercise if needed; 4) development of mutual goals in an exercise plan; 5) explain the purpose of a recording exercise log and instruction in correct way to keep an exercise diary; 6) discuss the available supports and resources that could motivate patients to initiate and maintain exercise, e.g., centre-based exercise programme, support from family members, health care providers, peer patients, and so forth. In the follow-up interviews, case managers reviewed the exercise log with participants, discussed unpleasant experiences related to exercise, exercise progress, and provided encouragement. According to the progress participants made, the exercise goals and plan were renewed or revised. Referrals were made as needed. Comparison group Participants in the comparison group were advised to participate in the in-centre exercise training programme which was available before haemodialysis sessions once a week for different shifts of patients. The training session lasted about 20 minutes and only flexibility and strength training were provided. During the training sessions, patients were advised to increase their daily activity levels.

Enrollment

113 patients

Sex

All

Ages

19 to 75 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Dialysis for >3 months;
  • Age > 18 years;
  • Kt/V (dialysis adequacy) >1.2;
  • Hemoglobin level > 8g/dl;
  • Ambulatory without assistance ;
  • Able to communicate in Chinese;
  • Able to and willing to provide consent.

Exclusion criteria

  • Unstable physical conditions or severe musculoskeletal diseases that might hinder exercise training;
  • Severe hearing impairment;
  • Diagnosed with mental diseases;
  • Meeting or exceeding the exercise recommendation.

Trial design

113 participants in 2 patient groups

Nurse-led interviewing
Experimental group
Description:
Participants in experimental arm received the in-center exercise training (20 minutes) before hemodialysis sessions weekly for 6 weeks and were instructed to perform exercise at home. They were additionally instructed to start walking or brisk walking at low duration and gradually progress to a maximum of 30 minutes daily per week. To facilitate exercise progression, the nurse case managers discussed exercise benefits, explored exercise barriers and developed mutual goals with patients. The nurse motivated them and checked the exercise behaviors to ensure adherence to the recommended exercise regime. The nurse case managers interviewed the patients weekly for six weeks and biweekly for another six weeks.
Treatment:
Behavioral: Nurse-led interviewing
Brief group exercise
Active Comparator group
Description:
Participants received the in-center exercise training (20 minutes) before hemodialysis sessions weekly for 6 weeks and were instructed to perform exercise at home. The in-center training was conducted by the researcher with a group of four-to six participants focusing on flexibility and strengthening exercise only.
Treatment:
Other: Brief group exercise

Trial contacts and locations

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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