The Relationship of Stump Length With Muscle Strength in Patients With Traumatic Unilateral Transfemoral Amputation

G

Gaziler Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Education and Research Hospital

Status

Not yet enrolling

Conditions

Amputation, Traumatic

Study type

Observational

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT05435326
28

Details and patient eligibility

About

Amputation is the loss or removal of a body part such as an arm or leg. It is the last option in trauma treatment and irreversible procedure. Amputation rehabilitation begins in the pre-amputation period. The goal of rehabilitation after an amputation is to help the patient return to the highest level of function and independence possible, while improving the overall quality of life. Many factors can affect the success of lower limb amputation rehabilitation, and stump length is one of them. A sufficient stump length provides a large contact surface and increases the stability of the socket unit.

Full description

Amputation is the loss or removal of a body part such as an arm or leg. It is the last option in trauma treatment and irreversible procedure. Amputation rehabilitation begins in the pre-amputation period. The goal of rehabilitation after an amputation is to help the patient return to the highest level of function and independence possible, while improving the overall quality of life. Many factors can affect the success of lower limb amputation rehabilitation, and stump length is one of them. A sufficient stump length provides a large contact surface and increases the stability of the socket unit. People with unilateral transfemoral amputation have lost their knee and ankle joint. This causes a loss of proprioceptive feedback from the ankle joint, knee joint and related muscles. Muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and balance problems are common in amputee patients. There is not enough data to reveal the relationship between stump length and muscle strength, balance, and proprioception. The aim of this study to evaluate the relationship of stump length with muscle strength, balance, and proprioception in patients with traumatic unilateral transfemoral amputation.

Enrollment

16 estimated patients

Sex

Male

Ages

18 to 65 years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

* Age between 18-65 years * Time after amputation ≥ 6 months * Unilateral transfemoral traumatic amputation

Exclusion criteria

* Bilateral transfemoral amputation * Unilateral non-traumatic transfemoral amputation * Presence of neurological, auditory, or vision-related disease that may affect balance and proprioception * Presence of cardiovascular or pulmonary disease that will affect muscle strength

Trial contacts and locations

0

Loading...

Central trial contact

Gizem Kılınç Kamacı, MD

Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

Clinical trials

Find clinical trialsTrials by location
© Copyright 2024 Veeva Systems