Topical Psoralen Ultraviolet Light A Versus Narrow Band Ultraviolet Light B Treatment for Recalcitrant Dermatoses of the Hand

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University of British Columbia

Status and phase

Unknown
Phase 2

Conditions

Vitiligo

Treatments

Device: Phototherapy

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT01792245
H12-02854

Details and patient eligibility

About

Hand psoriasis/eczema is a common problem which is characterized by itchy, erythematous and scaly lesions often with a long lasting and relapsing course. Treatment is difficult with considerable number of patients do not or only partially respond to the current treatments. Several studies have shown the therapeutic effectiveness of the combination of topical psoralen with long wavelength ultraviolet A radiation (PUVA) in treating hand psoriasis/eczema. Topical PUVA is has several short- and long-term side effects. Narrow band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) has emerged recently as an important treatment for a variety of photoresponsive diseases including psoriasis and eczema. For most conditions (other than hand psoriasis/eczema) NB-UVB has been shown to have similar therapeutic results to PUVA with less side effects. There are only a few studies published on the efficacy of NB-UVB for hand psoriasis/eczema. Therefore, this study is aimed at comparing the efficacy and safety of t-PUVA and NB-UVB in treating these conditions.

Full description

Hand dermatoses is a common problem which is characterized by itchy, erythematous and scaly lesions often with a long lasting and relapsing course. Patients presenting with these severe cutaneous changes are classified as having severe recalcitrant hand dermatoses. Treatment is difficult with considerable number of patients do not or only partially respond to the current treatments. Current treatment regimens mainly involve the use of high potency topical corticosteroids, which has only limited affect. Systemic treatment modalities have been utilized but have serious side effects with limited improvement of disease. Several studies have shown the therapeutic effectiveness of the combination of topical psoralen with long wavelength ultraviolet A radiation (PUVA) in treating hand dermatoses. Topical PUVA is commonly associated with mild local sunburn reactions that often necessitate temporarily withholding treatment or decreasing the light dose. This subsequently leads to a delay in response or a prolongation of the treatment. Long term side effects include aging of the skin, hyperpigmentation, and a small increased risk of skin cancer that is more common in systemic PUVA. Narrow band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) has emerged recently as an important treatment for a variety of photoresponsive diseases including psoriasis and eczema. For most conditions (other than hand psoriasis/eczema) NB-UVB has been shown to have similar therapeutic results to PUVA with less side effects. There are only a few studies published on the efficacy of NB-UVB for hand psoriasis/eczema. Our hypothesis is that NB-UVB and topical PUVA will result in at least comparable improvement in hand psoriasis/eczema with less side effects associated with NB-UVB. We plan on conducting a prospective single-blind randomized clinical trial to compare the efficacy and safety of topical PUVA and NB-UVB in treating hand psoriasis/eczema. Study Objectives To compare the effect of topical PUVA and NB-UVB on visual cutaneous symptoms in patients presenting with recalcitrant hand dermatoses. To compare the side effect profile of topical PUVA and NB-UVB when treating patients with recalcitrant hand dermatoses.

Enrollment

30 estimated patients

Sex

All

Ages

19+ years old

Volunteers

No Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • Chronic symmetrical severe hand psoriasis and eczema (allowing up to 15% difference in surface area between both hands). These include patients that have received topical corticosteroids previously and may or may have not responded to treatment.
  • Subjects should be 18 years old or older.

Exclusion criteria

  • Any serious medical illness that will restrict the patient's ability to receive light treatments. That includes skin conditions, such as skin cancer or severe blistering conditions, or any serious medical conditions affecting the sensation of the extremities (eg. diabetic neuropathy, cervical stenosis).
  • Patients known to have a photosensitivity disorder
  • Patients with a history of intolerance to UVB and/or UVA light therapy.
  • Any subject who is on treatment or was on treatment for hand psoriasis/eczema less than two (topical) or four (systemic/phototherapy) weeks prior to enrollment in the study.
  • Pregnancy or breast-feeding.

Trial design

Primary purpose

Treatment

Allocation

Randomized

Interventional model

Single Group Assignment

Masking

Single Blind

30 participants in 2 patient groups

NB-UVB
Active Comparator group
Description:
This single-blinded randomized bilateral left to right controlled comparison clinical trial of 24 weeks duration will compare the efficacy of NB-UVB to t-PUVA. For each patient one hand will be randomly assigned to receive t-PUVA and the other hand will receive NB-UVB. Each hand will receive treatment with either NB-UVB or topical PUVA three times weekly. Treatment will be performed until complete or almost complete clearing of psoriasis/eczema or until 50 exposures (over 16 weeks) have been reached, whichever comes first.
Treatment:
Device: Phototherapy
Topical PUVA
Active Comparator group
Description:
This single-blinded randomized bilateral left to right controlled comparison clinical trial of 24 weeks duration will compare the efficacy of NB-UVB to t-PUVA. For each patient one hand will be randomly assigned to receive t-PUVA and the other hand will receive NB-UVB. Each hand will receive treatment with either NB-UVB or topical PUVA three times weekly. Treatment will be performed until complete or almost complete clearing of psoriasis/eczema or until 50 exposures (over 16 weeks) have been reached, whichever comes first.
Treatment:
Device: Phototherapy

Trial contacts and locations

1

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Central trial contact

Harvey Lui, MD, FRCPC

Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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