Verticality Perception - Effects of Prolonged Roll-tilt in Healthy Human Subjects

University of Zurich (UZH) logo

University of Zurich (UZH)

Status

Withdrawn

Conditions

Perception
Vestibular

Treatments

Other: perception of vertical after static roll-tilt over 5min

Study type

Interventional

Funder types

Other

Identifiers

NCT02760173
vert_perc_posttilt

Details and patient eligibility

About

The long-term goal of this research is to advance our knowledge of how the brain combines the information of multiple sensory systems coding for spatial orientation and how adaptation to vestibular imbalance influences spatial orientation. In healthy human subjects verticality perception is accurate while upright. After prolonged roll-tilt, humans show a systematic bias in perceived direction towards the previous roll-tilted position (so-called "post-tilt bias"). Here we evaluate different potential explanations for this bias using both vision-dependent and vision-independent paradigms of verticality perception.

Sex

All

Ages

18 to 65 years old

Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Inclusion criteria

  • ages 18-65 years
  • informed consent
  • absence of exclusion criteria

Exclusion criteria

  • peripheral-vestibular deficit
  • disturbed consciousness
  • history of sensory deficits
  • visual field deficits
  • other neurological or systemic disorder which can cause dementia or cognitive dysfunction
  • intake of antidepressants, sedatives, or neuroleptics
  • pregnancy, unless excluded by a negative pregnancy test
  • known neck pain or status post neck trauma

Trial design

Primary purpose

Basic Science

Allocation

N/A

Interventional model

Single Group Assignment

Masking

None (Open label)

0 participants in 1 patient group

Single intervention arm
Experimental group
Description:
This is the only arm in this study, measuring verticality perception after prolonged roll-tilt over 5min.
Treatment:
Other: perception of vertical after static roll-tilt over 5min

Trial contacts and locations

0

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Data sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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